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Old 04-20-2012, 06:17 PM   #1
marruda2
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Default Installing 6mil Poly Vapor Barrier

Hello,

I'm going to be installing Allure Vinyl Plank flooring in my basement. The instructions recommend treating the concrete with a sealer or laying down a 6mil poly vapor barrier if the basement has moisture issues. I know the basement does get a little damp so I intend to lay down the 6mil poly as recommended just to be safe. I've been searching for instructions on how to do this, and from what I can gather I should overlap the seams of the poly 6-8" and duct tape them, and also run the poly 2-4" up the wall. The questions I have are as follows:

1.) Should I duct tape the poly to the wall and/or the floor, or should I just leave it "floating"?

2.) Can I cover the 2-4" of poly on the wall with baseboards? If not, how do I go about hiding it?

3.) Some articles/people advise against laying poly on the basements concrete floor as it may trap the moisture between the poly and the floor and cause mold issues. This doesn't make sense to me as the mold would require some "food" and neither the concrete or poly are organic. That said, I'm not a professional and would like to be sure. Are there any concerns with laying the poly directly on the concrete slab/floor and then laying the vinyl planks directly on top of that?

4.) Do you have any tips or things to watch out for when installing this type of flooring?

Here is the link to the flooring I plan to install: http://www.homedepot.com/buy/flooring/vinyl-resilient-flooring/trafficmaster/allure-country-pine-resilient-vinyl-plank-flooring-11361.html

If you click on the More Information button, there is a link to the installation guide.

I apologize if I am not supposed to post outside links...I did a brief search for the forum rules but couldn't find them.

Thanks in advance,
Marruda2



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Old 04-20-2012, 07:04 PM   #2
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That moisture barrier is designed for above grade slabs, where any moisture has a way to exit correctly. The moisture build up under the vapor barrier will cause you problems. It may not be today or tomorrow, but it will happen. I would install french drains and a sump pump along the perimeter to ensure the water has a way to exit the basement.



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Old 04-20-2012, 07:33 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by havasu View Post
That moisture barrier is designed for above grade slabs, where any moisture has a way to exit correctly. The moisture build up under the vapor barrier will cause you problems. It may not be today or tomorrow, but it will happen. I would install french drains and a sump pump along the perimeter to ensure the water has a way to exit the basement.
Yea, or it might look like Havsu's swimming pool under there. You can buy vented vinyl base. But as per the instructions I would use a trowel on vapor retarder first, then 6 mil, then flooring.

"Water resistant for use in high-moisture areas, such as basements, kitchens and bathrooms"
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Old 04-20-2012, 07:50 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by havasu View Post
That moisture barrier is designed for above grade slabs, where any moisture has a way to exit correctly. The moisture build up under the vapor barrier will cause you problems. It may not be today or tomorrow, but it will happen. I would install french drains and a sump pump along the perimeter to ensure the water has a way to exit the basement.
Thanks for the response.

The house does have a sump pump but no french drains as far as I know. I wish I could take the time to do things right and install french drains but unfortunately I'm in kind of a tough situation. I don't actually own the house yet, but am in the process of buying it. My lender/bank is requiring that the basement flooring be finished before we can close the deal (for various stupid reasons). Normally this would fall to the buyer, but its a short sale and she can't afford it....so my only choices are install the floor in her house ASAP so we can close, or start looking for another house (which due to my current living situation isn't really an option). Because of this, I have until the end of this weekend to get a floor down. Sorry I didn't post all this info up front, but I wasn't sure it would be relevant and was trying to keep my questions as straight forward as possible.

Giving that I have 2 days to install some type of flooring, over a concrete floor in a semi-damp basement, what would be the best route to go? I realize there may be no way to do this "right" in such a short time, I'm just looking for the least-bad option. I would prefer to use the vinyl plank flooring I linked because I like the look and already purchased it (so the planks could acclimate in time). Would a concrete sealer as recommended in the instructions cause any problems if the floor is below grade? If I can use it, how long does it normally need to dry? Since this is a floating floor, could I pick it back up after I move in then have french drains installed and lay it back down?
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Old 04-20-2012, 07:55 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Ernesto View Post
Yea, or it might look like Havsu's swimming pool under there. You can buy vented vinyl base. But as per the instructions I would use a trowel on vapor retarder first, then 6 mil, then flooring.

"Water resistant for use in high-moisture areas, such as basements, kitchens and bathrooms"
Thanks for the reply.

So your saying if I use a trowel on vapor retarder first then the 6 mil I shouldn't have the problem Havsu mentioned above? If that is the case, do you know the answers to questions 1 and 2 in my original post?

Also, could you tell me more about this vented vinyl base, I haven't heard of one before? Are they expensive? Are they solid? As I understand it, the vinyl planks need to be laid on something very solid or they can come apart at the seems because they are so flexible?
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Old 04-20-2012, 08:50 PM   #6
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You going to have a tough time pulling that preglued stuff apart. Go for a click vinyl plank. Just leave a gap around the perimeter and no base for now. The vapor retarder I am talking about is Bostik MVP4.

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Old 04-20-2012, 09:18 PM   #7
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I really like the Bostic MPV4 barrier and then the plastic as a solution to your peculiar, rush situation.

overlap the plastic 6-8 inches and duct tape

run the plastic up the walls but use BLUE painter's tape an inch or two higher than the base you choose.

do a good job with the tape and don't be cheap because it's going to be in the way BIGTIME when you're installing, especially as you make the cuts. Just tape the whole wall up firmly and be done with it.

when it comes time to put on the base notch an 1/8' or 1/4' off the top of a small scrap piece of base. Use a sharpie (magic marker) to scribe the top of the base, less the fraction of an inch. Now with a relatively sharp blade in a utility knife go along and cut that plastic right on the line.

some guys I've seen use silicone to glue up wood base

typically I find the studs and get nails or screws plus some silicone along the top of the base

the silicone won't help you with the plastic there if wood base is going up you need to do a good job with the nails

I haven't put rubber base on a floor like or regular laminate with the plastic

so now I'm confused

I suppose you'd have to cut the plastic flush to the height of the flooring-----not really a big deal with the MPV4

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Old 04-21-2012, 12:36 AM   #8
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A couple manufacturers make vented vinyl/rubber wall base. Or if you are ingenious you can make yer own.

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Old 04-21-2012, 03:07 PM   #9
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A couple manufacturers make vented vinyl/rubber wall base. Or if you are ingenious you can make yer own.
Do share....please.
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Old 04-21-2012, 07:06 PM   #10
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Do share....please.
Butcher, take a look see. Our friends at http://www.tools4flooring.com/johnsonite-vent-cove-wall-base-4-x-4-ft-length.html sell it.

Now if your wanting to do wood just throw some double kerfs in the backside every 8 inches or so.


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