Bathroom vinyl plank installation - waterproofing around bathtub, etc

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romeroom

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This is my first time posting here and my first time installing vinyl plank in a bathroom.

I've installed all the planks with 1/4 inch expansion gap around the bathroom.

My questions center around making the floor as water proof as possible.

1. What do I do around the bathtub where the tub and floor meet? There has to be a practical way to prevent water from getting to the sub-floor through the 1/4 inching expansion gap next to the tub.

2. How about the rest of the bathroom? Do I treated the same as waterproofing around the tub?

I could really use your help. I have spent nearly 2 hours on YouTube and have found a number of conflicting suggestions on how to create a water tight seal while allowing for expansion. It feels like a waste of time.

Thanks in advance for your help.
 

zannej

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I'm curious about this as well.
I was thinking silicone caulk in gaps. If it stays flexible enough it can let the floor expand & contract.
 

zannej

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Maybe I've just had bad luck, but from my experience that sort of trim discolors & peels off over time. But, I have a lot of iron sediment in my water so everything starts to get stained from the iron. I've never used that particular trim though. Sorry I can't be of more help.
 

havasu

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On both my houses, I butted the flooring right at the tub, but allowed expansion on the opposite site. I then ran a small bead of color match caulking against the tub to prevent water intrusion. 20131103_132946.jpg
 

highup

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I just did two bathrooms in vinyl plank in an older manufactured home. One bath was tiny. 5 feet by 4 and a half feet. Just a large tub and toilet. I butted to the tub, left a 1/8 to 1/4 gap around the perimeter. I fit to the toilet flange leaving a quarter inch gap also. I filled that gap and the entire perimeter with silicone.
Silicone is messy, especially on laminate planks, so I carefully taped off the perimeter, using blue tape on the floor. Filled the gap, wiped it smooth and flush to the floor, then peeled off the tape.
My fit to the tub was good, so I carefully applied a small bead of clear silicone there.
Use good bath type silicone like GE. It's more expensive but it's worth it.
I didn't wipe the bead of silicone against the tub, because it was applied slow and steady, leaving a clean even bead.
You may find it easier to control the bead with a squeeze tube along the tub. Caulking guns, especially the cheap ones are a bit harder to control especially if you don't use them often.
If in doubt about your ability along the tub, you may want to put a strip of masking tapethe floor about 1/8" away from the tub, then carefully caulk it, then smooth it, then peel off the tape.
Practice caulking on a scrap right before you do the tub. You will get a better idea of how it flows. Use a new blade in a utility knife to cut the caulking tube to the correct angle and don't cut the tip too large.
If the toilet is next to the tub, you might want to to the wall behind the toilet also in case it floors over. Keep in mind caulking will make removal a bit more difficult if water does get under the floor somehow, but yes, if caulk at least the tub and a foot out on both sides of the tub because that's really where most water issues occur.
The flange of the toilet will set slightly lower because of the flooring thickness. I'll usually install a flanged wax ring, then add a half of a standard wax ring on top of the flanged one. A heated knife can be used to cut the standard ring in half..... yes still messy process.
Be sure to center them and mold them together a bit with your fingers.
 

havasu

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If in doubt about your ability along the tub, you may want to put a strip of masking tapethe floor about 1/8" away from the tub, then carefully caulk it, then smooth it, then peel off the tape.
That's exactly what I did Hi, except I used a second piece of tape 1/8" high on the tub as well.
 

highup

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That's exactly what I did Hi, except I used a second piece of tape 1/8" high on the tub as well.
Yup, it's a pain applying the tape evenly, but simplifies the job in the end. Gotta be sure to press the tape hard to the floor to get a good edge, and when the tape is pulled off it will leave a tiny ridge. Might be possible to find a cheaper making tape that is thinner, maybe automotive painters tape?
....and two layers wide on the floor because this can get messy.
 

zannej

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I feel better knowing caulk is what is suggested. I've got a tube of the GE stuff somewhere.
I suck at applying tape straight. LOL. I always seem to get it crooked. I need to practice better.

Havsu, the floor looks great!
 

highup

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I feel better knowing caulk is what is suggested. I've got a tube of the GE stuff somewhere.
I suck at applying tape straight. LOL. I always seem to get it crooked. I need to practice better.

Havsu, the floor looks great!
Question is, are you better without it? 😁
The floor part is easy, the tub is harder to do.
 

romeroom

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I just did two bathrooms in vinyl plank in an older manufactured home. One bath was tiny. 5 feet by 4 and a half feet. Just a large tub and toilet. I butted to the tub, left a 1/8 to 1/4 gap around the perimeter. I fit to the toilet flange leaving a quarter inch gap also. I filled that gap and the entire perimeter with silicone.
Silicone is messy, especially on laminate planks, so I carefully taped off the perimeter, using blue tape on the floor. Filled the gap, wiped it smooth and flush to the floor, then peeled off the tape.
My fit to the tub was good, so I carefully applied a small bead of clear silicone there.
Use good bath type silicone like GE. It's more expensive but it's worth it.
I didn't wipe the bead of silicone against the tub, because it was applied slow and steady, leaving a clean even bead.
You may find it easier to control the bead with a squeeze tube along the tub. Caulking guns, especially the cheap ones are a bit harder to control especially if you don't use them often.
If in doubt about your ability along the tub, you may want to put a strip of masking tapethe floor about 1/8" away from the tub, then carefully caulk it, then smooth it, then peel off the tape.
Practice caulking on a scrap right before you do the tub. You will get a better idea of how it flows. Use a new blade in a utility knife to cut the caulking tube to the correct angle and don't cut the tip too large.
If the toilet is next to the tub, you might want to to the wall behind the toilet also in case it floors over. Keep in mind caulking will make removal a bit more difficult if water does get under the floor somehow, but yes, if caulk at least the tub and a foot out on both sides of the tub because that's really where most water issues occur.
The flange of the toilet will set slightly lower because of the flooring thickness. I'll usually install a flanged wax ring, then add a half of a standard wax ring on top of the flanged one. A heated knife can be used to cut the standard ring in half..... yes still messy process.
Be sure to center them and mold them together a bit with your fingers.
Thanks for taking the time to share these great ideas.
 

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