Carpet transition to vinyl planks

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paqman

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I'm trying to decide the best way to transition carpet from three bedrooms into the hallway where there will be vinyl plank. (It is installed down the hallway, just not the last row into the doorways yet. I know I want the transition to be right where the door closes, but having a hard time which type of transition to use. I was originally going to use a z bar, because I like that it will just be a clean transition with no t-mold or end cap or anything like that, but am open to other ideas.

One question I have, is when I place a tack strip (z bar or not) in the doorway to do my transition, there is a taped seam right there where I need to do it. I just tore the old tack strips out when I demo'd the carpet in the hallway getting ready to put the plank down, so I'm sure there was tack strip there already, but will the tape seam grab onto that tack strip ok? I don't think a z bar will work there, because the tape seam is too stiff to fold uner the z-bar. But I suppose as long as the tape seamed portion of the carpet will grab onto the tack strip, then I could stretch it over that and then use a t-mold transition or something. Obviously I'm inexperienced at carpet, and just trying to diy this. So thanks for the patience!

Thoughts on this? Here is a pic of one of the doorways.
20220307_075804.jpg
 

C.J.

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I would just tuck the carpet directly to the LVP. Figure out where you want your LVP to stop and leave a clean cut edge to tuck to on the LVP. Put your tack strip maybe 1/4” away from the LVP. Now you flop the carpet over the LVP and figure out where you need to cut the carpet at. Cut it, bump it and tuck it. The tack strip will grab through the seam tape, you just gotta press it down on the pins hard enough for them to poke through the tape.
 

paqman

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I would just tuck the carpet directly to the LVP. Figure out where you want your LVP to stop and leave a clean cut edge to tuck to on the LVP. Put your tack strip maybe 1/4” away from the LVP. Now you flop the carpet over the LVP and figure out where you need to cut the carpet at. Cut it, bump it and tuck it. The tack strip will grab through the seam tape, you just gotta press it down on the pins hard enough for them to poke through the tape.
Ok thanks! When you say tuck it directly to the LVP, you're talking with like a z-bar? Tuck it where?
 

Incognito

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I would just tuck the carpet directly to the LVP. Figure out where you want your LVP to stop and leave a clean cut edge to tuck to on the LVP. Put your tack strip maybe 1/4” away from the LVP. Now you flop the carpet over the LVP and figure out where you need to cut the carpet at. Cut it, bump it and tuck it. The tack strip will grab through the seam tape, you just gotta press it down on the pins hard enough for them to poke through the tape.
That always looks best to me if the hard surface material is thick enough to protect the raw carpet edge. And we always ran a 1/4" bead of Elmers (latex seam sealer) in the gully to seal the edge of the carpet and prevent unraveling.
 

C.J.

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Ok thanks! When you say tuck it directly to the LVP, you're talking with like a z-bar? Tuck it where?

We are talkin about floating LVP, right? Set the tack strip about 1/4” back from the LVP and to tuck the carpet into that 1/4” gully. As Incognito mentioned, squirt some seam sealer into the gully before you tuck it and that helps to prevent any fraying that may happen down the road.
 

paqman

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We are talkin about floating LVP, right? Set the tack strip about 1/4” back from the LVP and to tuck the carpet into that 1/4” gully. As Incognito mentioned, squirt some seam sealer into the gully before you tuck it and that helps to prevent any fraying that may happen down the road.
Yep, floating LVP. Ok, I gotcha thanks. That could work.
 

MSLI

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I would run the LVP deeper into the door opening, ( 3/4 ‘s rather than 1/2 ) then burn the seam tape off, power stretch the carpet up and this should give you at least 3/4” of extra cpt to turn and tack. One inch is ideal , but you should be able to make it work. However, I would really like to see a baby threshold that matches the flooring. What type of floor is it ? I’ll try to post a picture from a repair job my friend just did.
 

C.J.

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This is what we’re talkin about but instead of tucking the carpet to hardwood you would be tucking to LVP. MSLI suggests using a baby threshold. In that case you would install a threshold then tuck the carpet to the threshold the same way you would tuck to hardwood or LVP.

 

JPfloor

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I would run the LVP deeper into the door opening, ( 3/4 ‘s rather than 1/2 ) then burn the seam tape off, power stretch the carpet up and this should give you at least 3/4” of extra cpt to turn and tack. One inch is ideal , but you should be able to make it work. However, I would really like to see a baby threshold that matches the flooring. What type of floor is it ? I’ll try to post a picture from a repair job my friend just did.
Agreed. If the carpet is higher than the hard floor tackless or Z- bar (we used to call it fireplace metal for a reason, not designed for traffic areas) will create a wear point. Be careful not to overheat when removing the heat tape. Hand binding is another option.
 

DarisMulkin

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I agree with what everyone else is saying but number 1 get rid of the seam tape. Just fold it back and put a board under it exposed from the edge to protect the face of the carpet and melt it off. Getting ahold of the tape and lifting while heating the tape will let loose, when it does move on to the next area and keep on doing until done. Big thing is don't burn your fingers. Oh you could do this with a household iron just wrap foil on the bottom of the iron so you don't ruin it for iroining your clothes and steam is not needed. Had someone ask me that once.
 

MSLI

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The hallway re-stretch I just did had two turn and tack doorways that I was dreading to disrupt. Thank baby Jesus, the wrinkles went out the other way. That said, ( I always wanted to say that expression 😝 ) it sure would be nice if a permanent threshold was there instead, because most times the staple or dimple marks from a turn and tack can be displeasing........ My friend did not take a pic of the transition, but It was actually the track and snap laminate “T” type. Not a baby threshold..... good luck, show us completed pictures no matter what so we can all learn.
 

highup

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I agree with what everyone else is saying but number 1 get rid of the seam tape. Just fold it back and put a board under it exposed from the edge to protect the face of the carpet and melt it off. Getting ahold of the tape and lifting while heating the tape will let loose, when it does move on to the next area and keep on doing until done. Big thing is don't burn your fingers. Oh you could do this with a household iron just wrap foil on the bottom of the iron so you don't ruin it for iroining your clothes and steam is not needed. Had someone ask me that once.
I have one coming up, fitting to a new 9/16" prefinished wood floor.
After removing the seam tape there will be void between the wood and the carpeting. 😖
I wish guess could at least, center doorway seams. Yes, of course it's a stiff Berber.
Might have to make or order a transition piece to extend the wood towards the carpet.
 

MSLI

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After removing the seam tape there will be void between the wood and the carpeting. 😖
. Could have left the other color as an accent piece 🤪 not ! ...... occasionally, when doing repairs, you’ll get stuck with a seam 1” away from your tuck. In that case I’ll back seam it using 1.25” binding tape, so she’s low profile and flexible.
 

Tile Tom

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I do the z bar a lot for going up to lvp.

I personally hate transitions and try to avoid them any way possible.

I've never just tucked carpet into lvp but if the guys here say it's good to go, I'm on board
 

paqman

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I think I will try to remove the seap tape, then will bring the LVP up with an end cap/trim peice, and try to tuck the carpet to it as you guys have said. Wish me luck.
 

highup

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I think I will try to remove the seap tape, then will bring the LVP up with an end cap/trim peice, and try to tuck the carpet to it as you guys have said. Wish me luck.
One thing that may help a little bit is use a hair dryer, not a hot air gun just a hair dryer. Heat the carpet backing toasty warm on the edge where you're working it... The warmer the better, then as quick as you can get the carpet stretched in and do what you have to do while it's still warm.
If there's enough to turn under, then you could do the same thing and turn it under and tack it while warm. Heat will be your only friend if there's tape residue on the carpet backing where you're working it.
 

paqman

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One thing that may help a little bit is use a hair dryer, not a hot air gun just a hair dryer. Heat the carpet backing toasty warm on the edge where you're working it... The warmer the better, then as quick as you can get the carpet stretched in and do what you have to do while it's still warm.
If there's enough to turn under, then you could do the same thing and turn it under and tack it while warm. Heat will be your only friend if there's tape residue on the carpet backing where you're working it.
That's good to know thanks. I'm getting a bit intimidated by this because I know I only have so much carpet to work with lol. Today I'm going to try one, and just use a trim piece on the vinyl plank. And end cap, not a t mold. Then bring the tack strip pretty close to it like others have said, stretch the carpet over it, and then I got some seam glue to apply to the end of it and tuck it in behind the end cap piece. Only I could find seam glue in a tube, just the stuff in a little bucket. Assuming that will still work?

And I had thought about removing the tape as well, because I don't see it tucking very well with the tape attached. We'll see how that goes. But I appreciate the tip about heating it when doing the stretching and stuff, as I could see even after the tape is gone, that part being really stiff because of residual seam glue.
 

highup

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The tape has to be removed if you have any chance to be successful at this.
Are you talking an end cap or what they call a baby threshold?
 

paqman

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yeah, I hadn't heard the term baby threshold, but yes, end cap is what I plan on using to do this tuck method. The plank by itself I think is not deep enough to really do this. I think the end cap will look better.
 

MSLI

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Note ! While burning the seam tape off, make sure the thermoplastic melts enough to be low profile and flat. This is a good thing because it will firm up and stabilize the edge. You can now eliminate the use of seam sealer, as it sounds like you don’t have the right stuff anyway. Use a hot glue gun to firm up any missing areas, 1/2” wide area along the backing, let it dry, then tuck her in the gully. I do this to all my carpets at high profile entrance areas. If the backing splits during the tucking process 😡 and you just power stretched her up, OBOY ! I’m pissed off. You’ll do fine, and if not, chances are you can blame it on the Cat 🐈 😜
 

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