Carpet transition to vinyl planks

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The good thing about this version is it snaps securely into a track but still allows for expansion and contraction of the vinyl or laminate under the flange. A much better option than tucking directly to the floating floor.
I don't think that transition has a track. It looks like it should, but it doesn't. The local carpet one shop not similar type transitions that were sent with the flooring, and they shipped a plastic transition in the same tube. I tried to get one to snap in and it wouldn't. This happened two times, so I called the company.
The tech Guy said, there are no tracks for our materials they're made to be glued in place. I said I have a transition that was made by your company and the tube came with a plastic track.
He said to me a second time, our transitions do not have tracks.
It appears that the company that sent the transition assumed that the plastic tracks were required and they put them in the tube along with the transition piece.
It would require a metal track with strong gripper teeth to hold on to a transition like that. Notice how smooth the sides are of that area where you think the track should grip onto. I may be wrong, but I don't believe there's a track for that particular transition piece.
Hence the frustration with transition pieces where you need to butt carpet against. Everyone hates them and very few people use them....... It's because of the design and lack of thought by the companies to make the installation easy. If the transition piece was easy to install, installers would use them. The extra thickness of them compared to the floor gives more area to tuck carpet in.
 

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My criteria, that must be met for tucking to LVP would be that it must be at least 3/16 to 1/4” thick. How about you guys ? But I prefer a standard size of 3/8 “ to 7/16” That’s why end caps or thresholds usually work best and if you choose the right one, very stylish. Every situation is different, that’s why the world of floor installation needs ‘ Installation Managers ‘ I bet if we did an IRS search for that occupation, very little numbers would come up.
 

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Ha well I don't have any sort of stretcher, just a knee kicker.

Well once the seam is burned off the edge of the carpet is going to be close to the inside edge of the door jamb. I can tell because of where it's bending now.

Sorry, I haven't done any of this yet, because I'm considering just paying a neighbor who is a carpet installer to just come and do it. I've done this whole project diy (painted cabinets, installed backsplash, flooring, etc.) but these carpet transitions are beyond what I've done or have tools for I think.
That's probably a good idea, because the installer has probably run into these issues before. I know he doesn't like them in adventure than we do...... But have him do it would probably be the correct decision.
It's not worth beating yourself silly and making the problem worse. It's easier for an installer to fix something that hasn't been messed with.
 

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Drawing boards are a good thing.
In the past year I've turned down some jobs that were offered to me because I'd rather have somebody else do them. Could I have done them, yes. Would I have been comfortable doing them, no.
I just figured that I'm old enough to say no and save myself some stress and aggravation.
With the information provided here, it'll be nice to get a report back after it's completed as to have a task was accomplished.
 

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I just posted this elsewhere but this seems like a more appropriate place to show a custom installation in a fairly new home.
I think I'll call this the miracle translation.
It's a miracle someone didn't lose their job over this.
It's a concrete floor, so they even had to drill and plug the floor. I'm hoping they charged extra for that. 😁
 

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This particular one does. I have them and have tested the track it snaps on just fine.
Well I'm glad for the update. I don't recall the brand, possibly Provenza? They had a matching molding that was nearly identical to that one but the tech guy from the company said they do not make a track for it, that's why I said what I said. I'm glad there is a track for it. It seems crazy that there isn't a track for all of these products. More people would use them if they didn't need a fart around with gluing them down which is time consuming
 

C.J.

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I would much rather glue and pin nail if necessary than mess around with a track. Early on I would put the track down and somebody would come behind me and install the carpet. Problem was they would try and tuck too much carpet in the gully and the transition would break loose because the middle MDF piece that snaps into the track would break. Of course that was somehow my fault.
 

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I like the transitions because some floors are pretty thin the transitions can add good eighth of an inch sometimes to the thickness which give you something to talk to or use z bar against. Anything that keeps the hard surface floor height higher than the tack strip is a good thing for the carpeting sake.
 

MAjwoody

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We have a local mill that makes solid oak transitions. I also have a great prefinisher down the street that can match colors very well. Much more solid that mdf and plastic. Just have to plan ahead or go back because of finishing turn around time. I've given up on matching stain myself. Gets expensive when your as bad as I am at it, lol!
 

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Well I'm glad for the update. I don't recall the brand, possibly Provenza? They had a matching molding that was nearly identical to that one but the tech guy from the company said they do not make a track for it, that's why I said what I said. I'm glad there is a track for it. It seems crazy that there isn't a track for all of these products. More people would use them if they didn't need a fart around with gluing them down which is time consuming
It's PureSPC Max by Republic Floor.
 

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We have a local mill that makes solid oak transitions. I also have a great prefinisher down the street that can match colors very well. Much more solid that mdf and plastic. Just have to plan ahead or go back because of finishing turn around time. I've given up on matching stain myself. Gets expensive when your as bad as I am at it, lol!
You can spend a ton of time doing that. One thing that can help, is after sanding the transition, you wipe it down with a wet sponge and let it dry. I'm talking a wet sponge not a damp one. That will open up the wood grain to accept the stain. Once the water has been on there for a few minutes, or 15 or 20, you can blow it dry with a hair dryer.
Once it's totally dry you can glance over it very lightly once again with sandpaper. I stained an old piece of wood to show a customer some options for a bunch of quarter round for a couple bedrooms and the hallway.
We pick the color and I bought quarter round and sanded it all. Then I vacuum them free of dust.
I could not for the life of me make that oak look even remotely close to the scrap piece that I had stained. The old piece of wood that I had stained had been out in my van for a while. It was dry, but the moisture in the air was enough to open the grain to accept some stain and that's why it took stain much, much differently than the piece of wood that I sanded.
Look it up, they call it water popping.
No, I still don't like trying to match stain, that ain't my business either. 😁
 

JPfloor

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I would much rather glue and pin nail if necessary than mess around with a track. Early on I would put the track down and somebody would come behind me and install the carpet. Problem was they would try and tuck too much carpet in the gully and the transition would break loose because the middle MDF piece that snaps into the track would break. Of course that was somehow my fault.
A thin bead of construction adhesive should resolve that.
 

JPfloor

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Well I'm glad for the update. I don't recall the brand, possibly Provenza? They had a matching molding that was nearly identical to that one but the tech guy from the company said they do not make a track for it, that's why I said what I said. I'm glad there is a track for it. It seems crazy that there isn't a track for all of these products. More people would use them if they didn't need a fart around with gluing them down which is time consuming
Lame excuse from the manufacturer. Sounds to me like that particular manufacturer screwed up on their specs for the track and is trying to market the product anyway. If such a product were originally designed to be glued down it certainly would not have the legs that are obviously designed to be snapped in. Doesn’t make sense. Glue with the track yes. Glue alone wouldn’t hold. I’d want my money back.
 
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JPfloor

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Now you’re gluing the reducer down, why mess with the track AND adhesive.
Now you’re gluing the reducer down, why mess with the track AND adhesive.
You’re right, you shouldn’t have to. You mentioned the carpet guys stuffing too much carpet in the gully and breaking the stem. Some liquid nail would reinforce that stem. Shouldn’t take too much effort to shoot a bead in before you snap the top down…Insurance.😊
 

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Lame excuse from the manufacturer. Sounds to me like that particular manufacturer screwed up on their specs for the track and is trying to market the product anyway. If such a product were originally designed to be glued down it certainly would not have the legs that are obviously designed to be snapped in. Doesn’t make sense. Glue with the track yes. Glue alone wouldn’t hold. I’d want my money back.
I think they realize that very few guys want to mess with a track.
Adhesive works but not on the shiny plastic alone. I don't know how well liquid nails works for plastic like that. When installing that baby threshold that cortec makes all scrub the bottom of that lip with a bastard file or some 50 grit sandpaper until it's rough as the North Sea during a winter storm. I've even gone as far as drilling 1/8 inch hole every 2 in on the underside of that lip so that the glue has something to adhere to. It may take you 5 minutes to do two doorways but I don't care. How much does it cost to come back and fix one that came loose?
I don't recall the adhesive I use it's called E6000. It works great on these cortec transitions, but you can't put big thick globs of it under the type of transitions that would require big globs of adhesive to make contact with the underside of the trim.
 

C.J.

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I’ve heard of this E6000. Haven’t used it but talking with another installer I hear it’s the bomb. Apparently that shit is bulletproof. There’s some flooring that it goes with. Roppe? Guy was installing it in commercial kitchens. They spec it as their sealant and I guess it sticks like nobody’s business.
 

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