Choosing flooring after foundation repair

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BearMom

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Dec 19, 2020
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Hello,

We are having our foundation repaired (and adjusted from a previous repair 18 years ago). We are in the greater Houston area. I need help understanding what flooring would be appropriate. I want all the pretty things, but I read (the only article I could find after several google attempts) that I should only use carpet, vinyl tile, or engineered hardwood. Of course none of those were on my radar. LOL

I'd like hardwood in the living areas/master bedroom/dining room, while using tile in the kitchen/laundry/master bathroom.

We are also redoing our master bath. If I can't tile the shower, then what? I'm finding this so confusing. Anyone been down this road? Any advice?

Thanks so much in advance.
 

Jon

In memory...
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Jun 28, 2011
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2,913
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Northcote, Auckland
Hello,

We are having our foundation repaired (and adjusted from a previous repair 18 years ago). We are in the greater Houston area. I need help understanding what flooring would be appropriate. I want all the pretty things, but I read (the only article I could find after several google attempts) that I should only use carpet, vinyl tile, or engineered hardwood. Of course none of those were on my radar. LOL

I'd like hardwood in the living areas/master bedroom/dining room, while using tile in the kitchen/laundry/master bathroom.

We are also redoing our master bath. If I can't tile the shower, then what? I'm finding this so confusing. Anyone been down this road? Any advice?

Thanks so much in advance.

What is on the floor now in those areas and do you just want a change?
 

highup

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The difference between solid hardwood and engineered hardwood is it solid hardwood expands and contracts a lot. Engineered hardwood expands and contracts at something close to 10% of the amount that solid hardwood does.
There are bragging rights about having solid hardwood, because it can be sanded and refinished numerous times.
That said solid hardwood is tongue and groove and the difference between the groove and the top of the floor isn't much over one quarter of an inch and you cannot sand down through the groove. That said you're only going to get a few sandings over the next hundred years.
There are companies that make engineered wood floors with a very thick top layer. Though I don't install these type of floors our local carpet one store has samples of a product called Sheoga. I think it's a 13 ply engineered floor and it can be purchased unstained or unfinished. It's top layer is about a quarter of an inch thick, and since it doesn't expand and contract a lot compared with solid 3/4-in hardwood, a material like this might survive much better on a concrete slab.
If you really want hardwood floors it would be worth searching out high-end engineered floors especially the top layer thickness if that's something that's important to you.
I'm trying to understand the confusing part about ceramic tile. I live in the Oregon coast and know nothing about where you live. You said your foundation was fixed or adjusted at least twice. I'm assuming you live in an area or have a foundation or a slab that's going to continue to settle to some degree over time. Only a contractor in your area familiar with settling or your particular situation with settling could determine if tile is an option or not. Tile does not flex at all. If the foundation shifts 1/8 of an inch then the tile is going to shift 1/8 of an inch. Honestly I think someone in the Houston area with a lot of experience and knowledge of the geology where you live might be able to help you better than we can. I can toss out some advice but I'm just guessing.

As far as the solid wood flooring goes I would definitely look into high-end engineered flooring simply because you won't have near the issues with slab moisture expanding and contracting the floor.
 

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