Direction of Laminate on Subfloor & Hallway advice

Discussion in 'Laminate Flooring' started by Patrick, Oct 7, 2018.

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  1. Oct 7, 2018 #1

    Patrick

    Patrick

    Patrick

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    Hi all from Ireland.

    I am just about to order a big bulk of Laminate flooring for my new apartment. I have a question about in which direction I should lay the flooring. Gut feeling tells me I should lay it perpendicular to the floor boards already there, but where I run into an issue (I think) is the hallway.

    If I lay the flooring in the Living / Kitchen area perpendicular to the floor boards already there, the hallway is pretty narrow. (43") or (1090 mm) in width. Again, the sub floor is in the same direction as you can see with the photos. I just haven't removed the carpet yet.

    I will be using 5mm XPS Foam underlay sheets that are 600mm x 856mm (23 1/2" x 33 1/2")

    I have taken some pictures of the hallway and living room.

    Any help on the matter would be great.

    Thanks :)

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    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
  2. Oct 9, 2018 #2

    highup

    highup

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    Do you own the apartment? If so, I'd install some 1/2" or 5/8"plywood over the subfloor and lay the laminate in the same direction as the subfloor planks. A subfloor like that won't work as a base for the laminate because those wide boards aren't flat and smooth.

    Edit:
    I just noticed your location. The floor that the laminate is going over needs to be quite flat. That's why I don't think your sub floor is ready to go. I just noticed your location. I would like to ask what the sub floor is made of and the joist spacing is.
    Also, read the installation specifications on the flooring you plan to purchase. Specifically the floor's flatness requirements.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2018
  3. Oct 9, 2018 #3

    Patrick

    Patrick

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    Hi, thanks for your reply, the joist spacing is 400mm as I had to measure it to find the joists to screw down the boards to avoid creaking. I used the biggest level I had and I can't find any really crazy spots that was off level or has the above minimum stated 2mm over a given distance. Amazingly the floor is really level. After about 300 screws the sub floor is not creaking in certain spots. The timber floor laid on the joists is pine. As this is an old mill converted into apartments there are two massive steel beam supports under each subfloor in the apartments.

    I also have on order an xps foam board underlay that helps any uneven boards. It stated that in the info section. It's 5mm thick.

    I look forward to your reply

    Best regards
     
  4. Oct 9, 2018 #4

    highup

    highup

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    How wide and how thick is the pine. I can't imagine any planks to be flat (no cupping or crowning) unless it was sanded smooth. That said, there will still be some movement between the joists and laminate floors need a smooth continuous surface such as plywood over the subfloor.
    Lay a short straightedge across two or three boards. I'm sure you will be able slip a piece of paper under the straightedge in places.
    The entire floor does not need to be so flat that a piece of paper can't be slipped under a long straightedge, but any cupping or crowning will cause issues especially because there are so many individual planks.
     
  5. Oct 9, 2018 #5

    Patrick

    Patrick

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    Hi!

    The pine planks are 5.5" (140mm) wide and 20mm thick. I am wondering if you have read over my last statement regarding 5mm XPS foam underlay which creates a pure flat surface for laying the laminate on ?

    When I get the laminate tomorrow etc, I will conduct the tests you are referring to with the piece of paper and see how it fairs out and get back to you.. If at all possible I would like not to have to put another sub floor on it (plywood) unless it's just in a small area or something.

    Thanks so much for your help so far, I really appreciate your advice and I will get back to you tomorrow.

    Best regards

    Patrick
     
  6. Oct 9, 2018 #6

    Ernesto

    Ernesto

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    Sounds good to go. You can run a floater any direction you want. Nailing down a hardwood would require going perpendicular or at a 45 degree layout.
     
  7. Oct 9, 2018 #7

    Patrick

    Patrick

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    Hi, so with the current subfloor and the 5mm xps foam underlay, I can move on with the job? Can I go with the boards or perpendicular to them?

    Regards
     
  8. Oct 10, 2018 #8

    Nick

    Nick

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    Any direction you want..
     
  9. Oct 10, 2018 #9

    highup

    highup

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    Depends on if your planks are cupped or crowned. Here's the worst image I've ever drawn, but hope it makes sense.
    Laminate floor joints don't like to be flexed when you walk on the floor, and that's why the specifications call for such flatness.
    The cupping in my crappy sketch is exaggerated in a huge way.
    Lets say the cupping shown by the red lines is 1/16 of an inch.
    Your plank floor and your laminate floor panels are not the same width, so the joints in each will line up randomly.
    The lowest part in the sketch is sort of a close up of the top sketch.
    It shows a joint of the laminate flooring beginning in the low spot of the cupped subfloor plank. The incline raises the opposite side of the plank. So, if all of the subfloor planks have that same 1/16 of an inch cup, the joints in the laminate flooring will flex a tiny bit every time you step on the floor.
    Might not hurt the floor.......... or, .... it may start making a squeaking or crackling sound as time goes on.
    It's hard from thousands of miles away to tell you if the floor is flat enough or if it has to much flex between the joists and needs a subfloor.
    I tend to go a wee bit overboard on prep so you might be OK............ just adding my two cents.
    The manufacturer out to be able to tell you if your plank floor is OK to go over or if you need underlayment...... I'd call them about that.
     

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