First time installing vinyl, please check my order of operations

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ErnieMccracken

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I chose from the Armstrong Lumex Plus line for my "pet room." Never done any type of flooring before, but want to give it a shot. Here is the plan after some basic research. Look ok? Any tips that you wish you knew before your first install?

1) Out with the old- Pull existing carpet up and remove trim. Remove all old hardware and clean as needed. Done.

2) Prep for new- Existing OSB Subfloor (house built in '94) now sits 0.7" below adjacent wood flooring and needs to be built up. Plan is to lay down 0.5" plywood to close the gap. Run it perpendicular to joists. Secure with 1" deck screws every 4"-6" apart? Leave 1/8" gaps at every intersection?

3) Make it flat- Use a leveling compound? Can I use a small amount just to raise the couple obvious low spots or do I need to coat the entire surface?

4) New Floor- Install new vinyl with 1/8" expansion gaps around the perimeter. Glue down (loose lay seems to have a bad rep).

5) Finish work- Reinstall old molding. Add new shoe molding. Nail into the walls, not through the vinyl. Any advice on a transition strip that I need to bridge the remaining 0.1" gap to my wood floor?
 

rugaddict

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wow i would love to see what kind of crazy tape measure you got---0.7 of an inch? makes my head hurt---osb is not a good choice for glue down vinyl--tends to delaminate i.e .come apart---the correct thickness would be approx 1/8 of an inch shy of the hardwood---no i dont know the decimal translation of 1/8 of an inch--this might be simpler to achieve with two layers---top layer should be smooth and flat---preferred fastener is a narrow crown staple-one inch--saves on prep---the direction is unimportant---leveling compound is used just for seams and gaps---as a full glue down gaps are unimportant for the vinyl--it shouldnt be growing if you do it right---shoe molding unneccesary--if you did your plywood thickness right a transition should be unneccesary as well
 

FloorMaven

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"Pet Room", where dogs, cats etc. reside? If you plan on wet mopping this floor often then you might consider silicone under the base or trim to keep any water from getting under the floor.

You don't need shoe unless you desire it for aesthetic reasons.

I'm fine with your 1/2" ply underlayment build up, though most 1/2" is utility grade and not smooth enough for glued down vinyl. You'll have to skim coat it with Ardex Feather finish or similar. Especially if you're using screws. If you have a narrow crown stapler you can use a 1 1/8" staple, divergent instead of chisel if you can find it.

Sounds like you have 11/16" to make up but 1/2" ply is probably 15/32" (.47) and if your vinyl is 1/8" (.13) you're at .60" or about 3/32". I couldn't immediately locate the thickness of your vinyl but you might be thinner. You can add some asphaltic felt paper under your underlayment if you need more height. Use some sample component pieces to check your height.

To finish to your wood floor you might consider leaving .12" gap with your underlayment and glue and tuck your vinyl into the gap.
 

ErnieMccracken

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Thanks for the help! Yes this is a pet area (new puppy coming next month) that I'd like to be able to wet mop. Any special type of silicone or just standard kitchen and bath stuff?

I called armstrong to verify that the thickness of my new vinyl is indeed 0.085". As for the plywood underlayment, do I need to leave expansion gaps? Since I don't have access to a narrow crown stapler (not set up for air tools), any tips on the type of screw or technique I should use?
 

rugaddict

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i use 100 percent clear silicone---i for one do not leave expansion gaps in my subfloor for vinyl but there are those that will argue---the concept of the fastener is that the length be just under the overall subfloor thickness---so they dont stick into the basement---screws are ok as are ringshank and spiral flooring nails---every 3 inches on the seams and every six inches in the field---the reason staples are prefered is now you have to prep the seams and fill in all the nail and/or the screw heads--keep the questions coming
 

FloorMaven

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http://www.tecotested.com/techtips/pdf/plywooddesignapplicationguide

UNDERLAYMENT
The following information provides general industry
guidelines for installing plywood panels as underlayment.
When installed over subfloors, plywood panels should be
applied with the face ply up, immediately prior to
installation of the finished flooring.
Before the underlayment is applied, the subfloor must be
dry and thoroughly swept or vacuumed. All popped nails
must be re-set and any loose panels must be re-nailed.
Plywood underlayment must be protected against
physical damage or water prior to installation. Individual
panels should be placed on edge for several days before
installation to equalize with surrounding temperature and
relative humidity conditions. Panel faces and edges need
to be protected from damage prior to and during
installation. The surface of the underlayment should also
be protected after installation to ensure a clean, smooth
surface for application of the finish flooring.
The plywood underlayment thickness required to bridge
an uneven floor will depend on roughness and loads
applied.
Underlayment recommendations for thin flooring
products are provided in Table 10. Nailing should begin
at the contact corner of the underlayment panels and
work should progress diagonally across the panels. Fig. 7
provides the recommended installation details for
underlayment along with fastener size and type. Panels
must be in firm contact with the subfloor as fasteners are
driven. As each panel is determined to be uniformly flat,
workers can continue to fully fasten panels toward the
opposite edge. End joints of underlayment panels should
be offset by at least 4 inches from joints of subfloor
panels. Edge joints of subfloor panels should be offset
one joist space from the subfloor joint. Nails should be
spaced a maximum of 6 inches o.c. along panel edges and
12 inches o.c. within the field of the panel (see Table 10
for recommended spacing with thin flooring). When
underlayment is glued to the subfloor, only solvent-based
adhesives are to be used.
In some cases, underlayment panels are applied over
lumber board subfloors. In such situations, the panels
should be laid parallel to the joists if the boards are
perpendicular to the joists. Underlayment panels may be
applied in either direction if boards are at an angle less
than 75 degrees to joists.

underlayment attachment.jpg
 

Nick

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Nailing should begin
at the contact corner of the underlayment panels and
work should progress diagonally across the panels.

That's how i do it . Keeps from stapling a pocket in the plywood .
 

Incognito

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Geez, thats so much work for a shiity piece of vinyl. :rolleyes:

But what if they called it LUXURY vinyl.

See how that makes it all seem worthwhile?

Sitting there in the Lap Of Luxury with a cheap plastic floor that requires 10 thousand dollars in floor prep and moisture remediation so it doesn't FAIL before the warranty expires.

GOD BLESS AMERICA
 

Floorist

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But what if they called it LUXURY vinyl.

See how that makes it all seem worthwhile?

Sitting there in the Lap Of Luxury with a cheap plastic floor that requires 10 thousand dollars in floor prep and moisture remediation so it doesn't FAIL before the warranty expires.

GOD BLESS AMERICA

Shows that they don't make it as good as they once did. I still work in houses that have 30 year old vinyl that looks as good as new, except it is out of style.
 

rugaddict

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Geez, thats so much work for a shiity piece of vinyl. :rolleyes:

this is a typical arizona installation day---from nine to noon they cut wood and glue it to cement----the rest of their very busy day is spent bitching to each other about why they havent won a nobel prize
 

FloorMaven

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Jon said:
Not certain with all your names but if I was using sheet vinyl I would run it up the wall 4 or 6 inches as a cove. If done this way There is no way water can get under the flooring

Most vinyl installers have problems installing flash cove...definitely not a DIYer project me thinks.
 

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