Hall to Laundry Transition

Discussion in 'Hardwood Floors' started by South28, Apr 2, 2017.

  1. Apr 2, 2017 #1

    South28

    South28

    South28

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    Hi everyone, I'd like to get folks opinion how they would make the transition from the hall red oak hardwood to the laundry room on the right side of the pic. The laundry room has a pocket door. On the floor now there is just a piece of pine that acts as a threshold.

    Picture 001.jpg

    Picture 002.jpg
     
  2. Apr 2, 2017 #2

    Floorist

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    What is the flooring in the laundry room?
     
  3. Apr 2, 2017 #3

    Jon

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    Also it has to join under the middle of the door so that one would not see the different flooring materials when the door is shut
    Presently one would see the laundry floor when the door is shut
    Take the hall red oak hardwood through a little further, maybe 2 inches
     
  4. Apr 3, 2017 #4

    South28

    South28

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    The laundry room shall be tile. At first I thought I would change the pine that you see in the doorway with a piece of wide red oak which would be about the width of the pine so maybe 6" but I just keep thinking I don't like the look of that looking like a threshold that wide.

    But it does look like I need a less wide threshold look as not sure even it the hardwood ended up under the door if the tile up against the hardwood without a threshold of some sort would look good.
     
  5. Apr 3, 2017 #5

    Jon

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    What you have now is where the paper finishes so when the door shuts you will still see some paper which you shouldn't
    The second photo shows the correct place, half way under the door, where to change different products, colours etc
    Make sense?

    001.jpg

    002.jpg
     
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  6. Apr 4, 2017 #6

    highup

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    Like Jon said, center the doorway wood "threshold" or at least keep the wood farther towards the inside of the door than the hall side of the door. Most likely the door will be open 90% of the time, so not a big issue how far the wood "threshold" intrudes into the laundry.
    That said, if the laundry room is going to end up in ceramic tile you will certainly have some height issues do deal with. Before pondering this threshold issue, you first need to figure out what the finished tile height will be if it is installed properly.
    The tile height is your starting point on the issue you are describing to us.
    Tile installation may involve removing that plywood and installing a cement backer board, or installing backer board on top of the existing plywood. Add the 1/2 backer board on top of that plywood, plus 3/8" tile thickness and you now need a floor transition between the hallway and laundry of about 7/8 of an inch.
    If the subfloor in the laundry is strong enough, you might remove the plywood, then install backer board, then the tile........... but the tile will still add some additional height above that hallway surface.
    I think that first step is that you need some input from a trusted tile installer so he can evaluate the options based on the strength of your homes flooring system. A good tile installer will tell you what the minimum installed height of the laundry room will be, based on what he sees on your homes age and floor joist span and construction. I think that is the first thing you need to figure out.
     
  7. Apr 4, 2017 #7

    Floorist

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    The height can be a little shorter if you use Ditra instead of CBU.
     
  8. Apr 4, 2017 #8

    highup

    highup

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    That's why they need a tile guy to check out the floor. Looks from the homes original the door casing it an old house. There might not be enough strength in the floor for tile if the plywood was removed, then backer put down. Depending on the subfloor, Ditra might not be strong enough even over the existing plywood. A good tile guy would know only by actually looking at the floor system.
    I notice that there's a pocket door involved, so it's even more important to make a determination before any trim goes on in case the door needs trimming.
     
  9. Apr 4, 2017 #9

    Floorist

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    If they can find a real tile guy and not some handyman. None left in my area. Only real tile installer here died about 5 years ago. I installed it 30 years ago but am not up on current methods. Was not profitable then.
     
  10. Apr 4, 2017 #10

    Nick

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    We use to get $9.00 a ft years ago . I just don't like installing it .
     
  11. Apr 4, 2017 #11

    Floorist

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    I had to wear rubber gloves. I am allergic to the cement in thinset, actually any powdered cement.
     

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