Help w/ Linseed Oiled and Waxxed Floor

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Chicago77

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Hello, I am new to the forum, and would love some advice.

I am rejuvenating a house my dad built many years ago, so this project is close to my heart. My next project to tackle is the floors. They are wide plank pine floors from the property, that I am 97% sure were originally finished with boiled linseed oil. There is a 2% chance that Danish oil was used and a 1% chance thye just were waxed, but my dad used boiled linseed for everything inside and out. The floors were then waxed every few years with bowling ally paste wax.

Most places they are in pretyy good condition outside of a few high traffic areas. After redoing much of the drywall and 40 years of dust, I was looking for the best way to clean them up. My thought was to take off the top layer of wax and that would get any dirt/dust that stuck in it out too, maybe condition the floors with some linseed or danish oil, then rewax.

SO, my quetions:

-How do I remove some or most of the current wax, is doing a small rub of danish oil after a bad idea? I was thinking mineral spirits. (my dad used to just use this spinning brush tool)
-Is it a good/bad idea to rub some linseed oil or danish oil into the wood after removing some/most of the wax
-Is there a better way?

I am familiar with building and finishing floors with poly and finishing furniture with oils, but I am not used to the older style of waxed floors.
 

highup

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First off, be extremely careful with danish or linseed oils. The oil isn't dangerous, but using it is. Mainly, if you're not familiar, spontaneous combustion is a major concern.
Basically, any rags used need to be disposed of properly. You might already be aware of this.
 

highup

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I don't know about the best solvent for the current wax, but I suppose linseed oil might be worth trying.
How large an area?
 

C.J.

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You prolly want to strip the entire floor unless you just want to spot strip select areas for touch up. I’ve been watching videos of crazy cleaning ladies strip wax from their hardwood floors and it’s kinda entertaining. You’ll want to use a stripper meant for wood floors. I don’t have any personal recommendations but a quick Google should do the trick. Or you can watch a few videos and have a chuckle as well.
 

havasu

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My neighbor at my vacation home had just rebuilt his 40's (1949 I believe) Ford pick up, which included white oak side rails. Thanksgiving day 2010, he gave it a nice linseed oiling of the wood rails, and set the rags in a bucket nearby. In the hot Lake Havasu sun, the bucket of rags self combusted, caught his truck on fire. The fire made its way to the motorhome, across the small street and caught his 6 car garage on fire, caught the adjoining garages on fire, then the flames spread to his beautiful trailer, destroying it and two other neighbors. Total loss was 6 boats, 3 motorhomes, 4 race buggies, 5 motorcycles, 3 garages, and 3 mobile homes. 12 years later, there is still dirt where beautiful garages once stood. Oh, no insurance!
 

highup

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I just remember oily rags self-combusting in a movie we watched in high school shop class. I'm not sure but I think it's even worse if the rags or cloth used is cotton.
You're supposed to lay them out in the sun or hang them to dry instead of putting them in a bucket.
 

Chicago77

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Yes, it is very self combusting. I have had this happen a few times (I knew about it so they were in a safe place). One drop cloth burst into flames when I picket it up to move, which was disconcerting.

Linseed oil is annoying all around, but short of significant sanding, Im sort of stuck keeping it.
 

highup

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Yes, it is very self combusting. I have had this happen a few times (I knew about it so they were in a safe place). One drop cloth burst into flames when I picket it up to move, which was disconcerting.

Linseed oil is annoying all around, but short of significant sanding, Im sort of stuck keeping it.
It's great that you're familiar with this properties. Some people haven't been around it and have no clue...
...and no house anymore either.
 

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