Humidity problems

Discussion in 'Hardwood Floors' started by Mark Ratajewicz, Aug 10, 2019.

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  1. Aug 10, 2019 #1

    Mark Ratajewicz

    Mark Ratajewicz

    Mark Ratajewicz

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    Hello

    I installed bunch of 5" unfinished hickory flooring in the winter. Soon after floor was sanded and coated with two coats of Glitsa sealer.

    We never did finish coat.

    House is still unoccupied and when it started to get warm and humid AC wasn't operational yet.

    humidity in the house is between 50% and 60% since new AC has been installed 2 1/2 weeks ago.

    A lot of the floorboards got cupped from excessive humidity. I know it will take time to lower humidity in the wood but I'm wondering if the boards will get flat again and if I need to wait for this to happen before I do finish coat.

    Rest o the project is getting to the end and I will need to finish this floor.

    Please advise.

    Thank You

    Mark
     
  2. Aug 10, 2019 #2

    Ernesto

    Ernesto

    Ernesto

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    Can you pull in a portable dehumidifier or window AC unit? Check your crawl space and or basement to see if it's dry as well. Always wait.
     
  3. Aug 10, 2019 #3

    highup

    highup

    highup

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    Wood floors need to be heated to close to normal "living conditions" as if it was occupied. Not once in a while, .........forever, or a different flooring ought to be picked out. Once the top has a sealer applied, moisture can only absorb into the lower side of the wood and it cups because that side of the wood swells slightly.................. or a lot depending on the humidity.
     
  4. Aug 10, 2019 #4

    highup

    highup

    highup

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  5. Aug 10, 2019 #5

    Mark Ratajewicz

    Mark Ratajewicz

    Mark Ratajewicz

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    heat was on all winter but there was no AC first part of the summer.
    At this point I just want to know if floor boards will get flat again when humidity goes low enough?
     
  6. Aug 10, 2019 #6

    Dan

    Dan

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    Best, truest answer is "maybe." Only time will tell.

    The rest of the project nearing the end is going to bite you if you don't wait for the flooring to lose the moisture it has gained since the installation. If you sand a cupped floor that has not reached equilibrium it will likely end up crowned. That will cost somebody (insert Mark here) the redo.

    Not only that, this floor would have two sandings taken off it's life ~or more because sanding a cupped or crowned floor usually takes more than just a refinish~ that maybe weren't necessary.
     
    Ernesto likes this.
  7. Aug 11, 2019 #7

    Mark Ratajewicz

    Mark Ratajewicz

    Mark Ratajewicz

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    thank you
    how long it will take you think?
     
  8. Aug 11, 2019 #8

    highup

    highup

    highup

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    I was told by another installer that a way of determining when a new floor has acclimated was to measure it's width when delivered, then re measure it over the next couple of weeks. When the wood measures the same twice it has probably stopped shrinking........ or growing.
    That being said, I wonder if you very lightly marked a few boards here and there to accurately take some measurements, you might know when id has stopped moving.
    Place a small straightedge across the cupped area where you have made marks, then slide an automotive feeler gauge under the cupped area in the center of the board. Find one of the feeler gauges that will just barely fit under it. When you go up size by size until a gauge will not slide under......... use the next smaller one.
    Record the thickness of that gauge, then do the same on other marks you have made............. use a pencil.
    Check every few days and note when the cupping stops changing........ then wait another week.
    Don't bother to start with the measuring unless the HVAC is on at the same level the home will be lived in.
    Dan or Ernesto, correct me if he'd be wasting his time with my suggestion.
     
  9. Aug 11, 2019 #9

    highup

    highup

    highup

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    In my previous post, I didn't re read this, so you're good to go if the smart guys say it makes sense.
     

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