Old 1925 Flooring

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tetsuuuuya

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Just bought a home that was built in 1925. I think this is the same flooring that was installed when the home was built.

Was wondering if it would be possible to put vinyl flooring over this type of hardwood floor. Or would it be a better idea to fully replace the flooring with newer style hardwood floor.

There are nails that go across perpendicular to the flooring all the way across and it looks kind of ugly imo, so Im wondering what the best option would be for this. The floors also creak/squeak a lot when stepped on and it's very annoying at night, so I think full replacement would be the better option.

I'm a beginner when it comes to home renovations/flooring etc so I'd appreciate any help/clarification you guys can provide. Thanks
 

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Floorist

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If that is original to the house its almost 100 years old. I'm not a wood guy but I think it has deserved the right to stay there. See if you can't find someone to refinish it to its original condition. It would be well worth it to me. Todays wood is not the same as yesterdays wood.
Exactly. I used to just hate when someone hired me to cover wood. Leaving the original also makes the house worth more.
 

JPfloor

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If that is original to the house its almost 100 years old. I'm not a wood guy but I think it has deserved the right to stay there. See if you can't find someone to refinish it to its original condition. It would be well worth it to me. Todays wood is not the same as yesterdays wood.

Agreed! If they’re not rotted or busted up refinish them. If it were me I’d design the house with those floors in mind. Think about it a bit, those trees were probably cut down by hand with an axe or a two man saw. Possibly by a WWI veteran? Probably milled right here in America in a mill powered by steam or water. Installed by somebody’s Great Great Great Grandfather…. A few extra nails might help with the squeaks. Be sure and countersink ALL the nails before sanding.
 
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Incognito

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It's no doubt "old growth" oak so as others mention it's kind of a shame to bury or demo out. But those nails are really awful to look at and it would obviously be time consuming to countersink and fill. As far as factors toward your decision my thoughts go toward how severe the movement and noise from evident inadequate subfloor. Are those boards directly nailed into the joists? That's kind of crazy. I wonder about your home efficiency ratings for HVAC. Depending on the climate and how much your spending to heat and cool that home tearing out the wood to get under the house and beef up the structure and add insulation could really pay dividends and add to your quality of life.

Going back with new hardwood would obviously me MY choice but your mileage may vary.

The home I'm in now has carpet over the original 1957 hardwood. There was substantial staining and termite damage so the guy who sold it to me just covered the floor with relatively cheap carpet. Eventually I may tear out the carpet and repair and refinish the existing wood. That's a very expensive project even for me and I'll do the repairs myself and hire out the sand/refinish. Pretty sure I'll have to rent storage for the furniture and stay at my Mother-in-Laws house for those couple weeks. That's why I'm in no hurry.
 

JPfloor

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True, it would be time consuming to sink all those nails.

The guys who originally installed that floor had to do that with every nail they used into the tongue. No nail guns back then… Although there were some machines available in that time period chances are scraping and sanding was done by hand too… Hard to imagine…
 

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Incognito

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Those look like:

Jobs Americans Wont Do......................

I wonder what country those guys working on the floorboards were from? They have distinct Eastern and Southern European features. Damn immigrants coming here and taking our jobs!
 

JPfloor

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On my father’s naturalization papers his occupation was listed as linoleum layer. During the depression, before he was drafted, he was doing what they called “flops”. No glue, underlayment consisted of old newspapers. His toolbox contained a hammer (for any nails sticking up) a Lino knife, and a sharpening stone… He was getting $5.00 a flop…Richest kid on the block!

The 5 bucks might have been after the war, not sure..😎
 
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