Stair Runner Installation

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JIMMIEM

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I stapled the runner under the top landing nosing and tried to cut it off by running a carpet cutter along the underside of the nosing. I butchered it. What is the best way to fix it? I have a couple of feet of extra runner.....just need to match the oriental pattern.
 

JIMMIEM

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Yes , Just cut a new one that fits without you having to cut it .
I have to cut it to length i.e. the height of the riser. The runner is one piece approximately 20 feet long. I was going to cut the damaged riser piece off at the corner where it meets the tread. The oriental runner has a repeating pattern so I was going to lay the damaged riser piece on top of the extra piece in order to get the same pattern from the extra piece.
 

highup

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It's a new rug of "oriental design" with surged edges? If so, connecting or butting the surged edges might be the tricky part.
 

JIMMIEM

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It's a new rug of "oriental design" with surged edges? If so, connecting or butting the surged edges might be the tricky part.
Yes, the edges are serged. How do you suggest that I fix/replace the riser piece?
 

DarisMulkin

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Yes, the edges are serged. How do you suggest that I fix/replace the riser piece?

The thing is the serging will ravel off very easily. Cut the serging with shears as a knife will make it want to run. When cut use some type of glue to seal it. I use latex that is for sealing seam edges or a dab off the glue gun. The same for the piece that is on the step. You are kind of stuck on how to cut that. I'd use a knife but cut from edge into the step on each side. SHARP Blade a must.

Daris
 

JIMMIEM

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The thing is the serging will ravel off very easily. Cut the serging with shears as a knife will make it want to run. When cut use some type of glue to seal it. I use latex that is for sealing seam edges or a dab off the glue gun. The same for the piece that is on the step. You are kind of stuck on how to cut that. I'd use a knife but cut from edge into the step on each side. SHARP Blade a must.

Daris

I'm really hesitant to cut what's already installed. Can't take a chance on goofing. I may just install a piece of scotia molding under the landing tread nosing to cover the carpet edge......my wife is onboard with that idea.
 

highup

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This is a photo of a surged edge being readied for a miter seam on a landing. The back of the surging has been slathered in latex so that when the final cut is made through the surging material, it will stay together. The latex is allowed to dry for a bit before making the cut.
This cut was made at 45 degree angle. Yours will be at a 90, so this may not be necessary for you. If it is, a very thin smear from a hot glue gun at this point might work.......... test on an inconspicuous area to see if the heat melts the surging material. You might not even need to bother with this step.
The second image is the cut edge of the surging.
After you make the cut, a decent size dab of latex in the center of the surging can be gracefully dabbeled around the inside edges of the cut with an awl to make sure all of the threads stay put. You may have to coax any loose or partial cut edges of the thread back into place........the latex will lock it in.
You need to be careful to only let adhesive get on the interior edges of the surging threads, because you don't want the adhesive to show.
Let it dry....... speed it up with a hair dryer, but don't rush this part because the two tacky edges with latex on em' will act like contact cement as you test fit the new piece.
Like Daris mentioned......... use a new blade for the cut, then immediately and carefully seal the cut edge with latex.
Once you can handle those sealed edges safely, you can butt together the old and new surged edges and staple the new piece in place.

005_2 Bixler runner  back sealed serge before cutting 750 for Jimmiem.jpg


004_1 Bixler runner sealed edge 750 for Jimmiem.jpg
 
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JIMMIEM

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This is a photo of a surged edge being readied for a miter seam on a landing. The back of the surging has been slathered in latex so that when the final cut is made through the surging material, it will stay together. The latex is allowed to dry for a bit before making the cut.
This cut was made at 45 degree angle. Yours will be at a 90, so this may not be necessary for you. If it is, a very thin smear from a hot glue gun at this point might work.......... test on an inconspicuous area to see if the heat melts the surging material. You might not even need to bother with this step.
The second image is the cut edge of the surging.
After you make the cut, a decent size dab of latex in the center of the surging can be gracefully dabbeled around the inside edges of the cut with an awl to make sure all of the threads stay put. You may have to coax any loose or partial cut edges of the thread back into place........the latex will lock it in.
You need to be careful to only let adhesive get on the interior edges of the surging threads, because you don't want the adhesive to show.
Let it dry....... speed it up with a hair dryer, but don't rush this part because the two tacky edges with latex on em' will act like contact cement as you test fit the new piece.
Like Daris mentioned......... use a new blade for the cut, then immediately and carefully seal the cut edge with latex.
Once you can handle those sealed edges safely, you can butt together the old and new surged edges and staple the new piece in place.

Is the latex caulk?
 

Nick

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I use to buy it at the cpt supply years ago by the gallon, And rub the backing with a piece of scrap before we made cuts in the woven.

I just checked HD, & Lowes.

Lowes has Capital latex seem sealer for $4.47 for a 8 oz bottle .

You may have to order it online .
 

Incognito

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I use to buy it at the cpt supply years ago by the gallon, And rub the backing with a piece of scrap before we made cuts in the woven.

I just checked HD, & Lowes.

Lowes has Capital latex seem sealer for $4.47 for a 8 oz bottle .

You may have to order it online .

Carpet supply houses around here didn't even know what it was last time I was in need of some. Neither did the "dispatcher" in our office. I went to the supply store and sure as hell they had it-----Parabond brand in a quart sized squeeze bottle if I recall correctly.

The store had it but no one working there knew what it was. I can just imagine trying to find it at Hope Depot.
 

highup

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Carpet supply houses around here didn't even know what it was last time I was in need of some. Neither did the "dispatcher" in our office. I went to the supply store and sure as hell they had it-----Parabond brand in a quart sized squeeze bottle if I recall correctly.

The store had it but no one working there knew what it was. I can just imagine trying to find it at Hope Depot.

Ya should have asked for some thermo seam sealer sticks. :D
 

Kyure

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The OP doesn't need to seal, shimidyy shabady slatheredid/miteredededly .
Good golly, one of the hardest things I learned was how to crease the runner at the top to make a tight cut without exposing the riser. That's it, that's all that happened.
A simple glob of hot glue on the serged edges is all it'll take after cutting a new riser piece.
 
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