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JCobb

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Vancouver Island
Anyone got any real world experience with these. The product comes in a roll 12’ x1’ and they go at the top of a commercial stair case. They are always a pain to get to lay flat, but these ones are just ridiculous. I have tried our usual tread adhesive, eco 560 put down with 1/16 sq notch. Tried back buttering as well as weighting them over night. Siga tape was meh. Maybe contact? Rep said to try schluter fix epoxy and weight.
 
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Mar 17, 2021
Messages
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Location
Fort Wayne, IN
In my experience it helps to reverse roll them for a period of time before installing to try and get the memory "reversed" out of them. They are typically slow-moving items and they can sit for extended periods of time rolled up on a shelf and in the heat they will tend to develop a severe memory to them.

I think Kerdifix would be a bit expensive and difficult to apply as it has the consistency of tooth paste. It's also sold in small tubes so you're going to need a good amount. It would most likely hold the product down if you can get it "troweled" some way. It's a silane (urethane derivative) based adhesive so it's incredibly strong and I haven't run into too many things it won't work on.

If you can get a "fresh" start somehow and get rid of the adhesive on the back of the material, I'd try reverse rolling and heat to get the memory out of the material. The longer you can let it sit the better. Then go at it with either an acrylic contact cement like Tarkett 946 (see attachement) or if you want to go outside the box the Kerdifix. You'll apply the 946 to both the substrate and the back of the material. Go one way on the substrate and 90 degrees to that on the material to create a little cross-hatch action. The little brush they show in the attachment is just a silicone tipped basting brush. You can find them pretty cheap at most Walmarts. Cut the bristles down to about 1" in length and this will give you a nice little "stipple" texture when applying the adhesive.

I would not use a regular solvent-based contact cement as 99% of them are not plasticizer stable and if that's a thermo-plastic rubber based (I'm pretty sure it is) material it will plasticize and let go. The acrylic contact fixes that issue as it's made for plastics.

Another little tip on the 946 adhesive that you won't see on the attachment is that you can "flash dry" it with a heat gun. Since it's acrylic it's non-flammable. Once you get it to the dry-to-touch state you can leave it like that if needed for several days as long as you can keep it from getting dusty. That's more for when you're doing treads with it but might come in handy to know.

Again, I think the key's going to be getting rid of the adhesive residue you have now, so you don't have a giant field chemistry experiment going on when you try to re-adhere the product. You may need to get new material to work with and re-prep the floor back to scratch.

Good luck with it!
 

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  • ID_EN_946_Premium_Contact_Adhesive_TreadNose.pdf
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JCobb

Supporting Member
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Joined
Sep 2, 2021
Messages
48
Location
Vancouver Island
Thank you for the advice. I guess I posted without a picture. Back-roll and different adhesive might do the trick.
 

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  • E3C8A0DB-4945-4DC8-AE1A-3E53DA6CB211.jpeg
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