Transition / Threshold ideas for apartment entry door

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jake18v

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I'm trying to figure out how to transition from a hardwood floor to a LVP floor in which the transition occurs right in the doorway.

Inside the apartment is 3/4" hardwood. The common hallways will be LVP. The door is metal door with metal frame. The metal frame hasn't been installed yet so I still have options on how to solve this. The picture below is just a mockup. The door is an inswing door.

My first thought was to install hardwood flooring 1" past the hallway side of the metal door frame. And then make a transition strip on the table saw. When I did the mockup - it looks off to me.

Another idea is to make a transition bigger than the width of the metal door frame. That way the frame sits right on top of the transition. No fancy cuts on the metal frame with the grinder.

How do you guys handle this situation? Seems like I have a lot of options b/c nothing is installed.
 

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C.J.

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You want the transition between differing floors to be underneath the door. That way when it’s closed you only see the floor that’s on the side you’re on. If you’re using a transition strip you want it to be underneath the door.

1.Place the transition strip in the door frame where you want it and mark how far you have to run your flooring on each side. install said flooring then install transition strip.

2 If you’re gonna use a big ol clunky metal door jamb then I would say install that first and run your flooring up to it on either side. That way if you change out either flooring you don’t have to mess with the metal threshold.

3. The coolest way but also the most work is to rabbit out the hardwood so the LVP slips underneath it, in said transition spot in the doorway. Hit the edge with a round over bit, give it a little finish and boom.
 

jake18v

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2 If you’re gonna use a big ol clunky metal door jamb then I would say install that first and run your flooring up to it on either side. That way if you change out either flooring you don’t have to mess with the metal threshold.
Thanks CJ.

I was thinking about installing the metal door jamb on the finished floor and notching the higher side (3/4" hardwood floor side) with an angle grinder. It's harder to see imperfections on the cut metal door jamb than it is on the cut flooring b/c of the angle of viewing. I don't plan on replacing the hardwood floor in my lifetime.

Other than the floor replacement issue, is there any other issue with putting the metal frame on the finished floor?

Thanks
 

JPfloor

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Another idea is to make a transition bigger than the width of the metal door frame. That way the frame sits right on top of the transition. No fancy cuts on the metal frame with the grinder.
I guess I’m old fashioned but that’s what I’d do. Either a marble or an oak saddle. The width of the frame (not bigger) 3/4” high or higher on one side to meet the hardwood and tapered or beveled down to meet the vinyl. Or just 3/4“ high and undercut it to accept the vinyl if the vinyl is a floating floor.

Is this an apartment building with a common hallway? Or a house? Are you installing the flooring before the metal door frames go in?
 
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Tile Tom

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A 3/4 hardwood reducer. End the hardwood under the door, install lvp up to it leaving the required expansion space. Take the thickness of the lvp off of the reducer with a table saw. Glue the reducer down on the lvp butting up to hardwood. Done deal
 

jake18v

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I guess I’m old fashioned but that’s what I’d do. Either a marble or an oak saddle. The width of the frame (not bigger) 3/4” high or higher on one side to meet the hardwood and tapered or beveled down to meet the vinyl. Or just 3/4“ high and undercut it to accept the vinyl if the vinyl is a floating floor.

Is this an apartment building with a common hallway? Or a house? Are you installing the flooring before the metal door frames go in?
It is a 3 family apartment building (1 apartment on each floor). My plan is to get the flooring in before the metal door frame goes in.
 

jake18v

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How much gap is ideal for a metal door above the finished floor? The door is in-swing into the apartment.
 

JPfloor

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Another good reason for a raised saddle. NYC has dirty air. No getting around it. You'll be amazed how much dirt will blow in under that door. Even if it is a clean building. If it were me I'd want a weather strip that seals to the saddle. So the door should be maybe 1/4" to 1/2" above the saddle. The clearance on the inswing would depend on the height on the saddle, it wouldn't really matter. I would like the clearance on the inswing high enough so you could put a throw rug in front of the door.
 
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jake18v

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Another good reason for a raised saddle. NYC has dirty air. No getting around it. You'll be amazed how much dirt will blow in under that door. Even if it is a clean building. If it were me I'd want a weather strip that seals to the saddle. So the door should be maybe 1/4" to 1/2" above the saddle. The clearance on the inswing would depend on the height on the saddle, it wouldn't really matter. I would like the clearance on the inswing high enough so you could put a throw rug in front of the door.
Good points. I was thinking about putting a rug outside the apartment entry.
 

Tile Tom

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There's fire codes as to how much of a gap can be under the door. I'm in northern NY and the code in my area can't exceed 1/8".
 

JPfloor

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There's fire codes as to how much of a gap can be under the door. I'm in northern NY and the code in my area can't exceed 1/8".
I haven't heard that one. I believe the 1/8” clearance is for between the door and the frame. For underneath the door I believe it’s 3/4”.

Again another good reason for a raised saddle with a sealing weather strip on the door. The fire marshal won't be concerned about the space on the inswing, just when the door is closed.
 
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