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DB233

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Oct 7, 2022
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We have a small warehouse and loading dock that is not temperature controlled. The flooring was probably put in over 30 years ago. Linoleum tiles over plywood. Many of the tiles at the loading area are missing. I would like to replace the missing tiles. Does anyone have recommendations for an adhesive that can withstand wide temperature fluctuations? I am in NH, so the warehouse can get to 80° or higher in summer and close to freezing in winter.
 

highup

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I'm thinking if the original lasted 30 years and replaced with the same.
...... Absolutely nothing made these days will last 30 years.
 
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Fort Wayne, IN
If this is truly linoleum tile, you're probably not going to want to use an epoxy adhesive. For high-performance areas they are going to recommend either a polymer modified acrylic or a moisture cured urethane adhesive. If you take a look at someone like Forbo's website for lino tile, they don't list an epoxy as an acceptable adhesive. Tarkett lists either an acrylic (965) or a two-part urethane for their lino tiles as well.

I'm not sure that epoxy is chemically compatible with linoleum.
 

JPfloor

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Feb 27, 2022
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I’ve only used it a few times, I guess now I don’t know if it was epoxy or poly but yea REAL tough to spread. Had to use a smaller trowel than I was used to....

And for spreading peanut butter....We used to heat it up with a halogen light. :cool:
 
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JPfloor

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Lol… We referred to the adhesives used for engineered wood as “peanut butter”. Not sure if that’s a general term or just a New York thing?

For making ice cream ( my current trade) we use a thinner (more peanut oil) peanut butter sauce. No heat required… 😅
 
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Besides the chemical makeup, the biggest difference between a two-part urethane and a two-part epoxy is that you HAVE to mix all of part A and all of part B when using a two-part urethane for it to reach critical mass and work. However, with most epoxies you can "ratio" them out in equal parts and they will still work. A two-part urethane if not fully mixed will essentially turn into what feels like a piece of latex rubber from a balloon with absolutely no adhesion to it whatsoever. Had a customer make that mistake once in a hospital under some beds trying to "save" the rest of the kit he didn't use for another job. Somewhere in my desk drawers I still have a piece of the adhesive. If I find it, I'll post a picture of what it looks like.

The other advantages to a two-part urethane over an epoxy is that it gives you a broader temperature range. At lower temps, urethanes don't become as brittle and susceptible to cracking. They also tend to have better moisture resistance both topically and from below than an epoxy.

Downside is they are a bit stiffer to trowel and they tend to have a horrible "green" grab (they're slow). So, you usually have to use a kneeler board or treat them like a wet set adhesive and stay off of them completely or you'll end up displacing the glue and leaving indentations in the floor. But, once they set, look out.
 

highup

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Besides the chemical makeup, the biggest difference between a two-part urethane and a two-part epoxy is that you HAVE to mix all of part A and all of part B when using a two-part urethane for it to reach critical mass and work. However, with most epoxies you can "ratio" them out in equal parts and they will still work. A two-part urethane if not fully mixed will essentially turn into what feels like a piece of latex rubber from a balloon with absolutely no adhesion to it whatsoever. Had a customer make that mistake once in a hospital under some beds trying to "save" the rest of the kit he didn't use for another job. Somewhere in my desk drawers I still have a piece of the adhesive. If I find it, I'll post a picture of what it looks like.

The other advantages to a two-part urethane over an epoxy is that it gives you a broader temperature range. At lower temps, urethanes don't become as brittle and susceptible to cracking. They also tend to have better moisture resistance both topically and from below than an epoxy.

Downside is they are a bit stiffer to trowel and they tend to have a horrible "green" grab (they're slow). So, you usually have to use a kneeler board or treat them like a wet set adhesive and stay off of them completely or you'll end up displacing the glue and leaving indentations in the floor. But, once they set, look out.
Why don't you set up your own YouTube channel and pour this information out to the masses.
There's nowhere on the internet a person could find the information that you present, especially so in the way that you say it. You never skip a beat or leave something partially answered. Great information.
....and don't tell us you're reading all this off of a teleprompter because we want to continue to be amazed. 😁
 

C.J.

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That is a terrible job, it could give you carpet tunnel, unless it is electrical.

Whoa, we’re fully digital here but I do still have Mr. Pink in case of emergency.
CD0DAF07-4D77-43D5-8C47-C484C38EDEFF.jpeg
 

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