Where is this smell from the laminate coming from?

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Chlorinated

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I have Mcs(multiple chemical sensitivities) and in fear of vocs from new laminate purchased some used ones so that the vocs had gassed off.

Now after laying the laminate I covered up the sides(beading area gaps) with duct tape so the new wood smell wouldn't come out. However the laminate was still emitting an very powerful gas which was going to all parts of my flat.

I initially thought it was mdf dust and mopped and heap vacuumed it to death for weeks but then I realised it wasn't mdf dust. It was a gas of some sort. I then covered 90% of the laminate with vinyl just to create a small test area. I noticed the smell was still coming from the remaining laminate i.e. it had been reduced by about 90%. I then covered the gaps between laminate on the test area with duct tape because I thought the gas must be coming from inbetween the gaps and not the laminate surface. However despite being 100% closed off gaps it was clearly emitting from the laminate surface. I then duct taped the surfaces and the smell goes.

Now these laminate I used were 7 years old. Before I bought them I smelt the surface to check there was no voc smells. So my question is where on earth and what on earth is this smell, how does it permeate through the surface on the laminate?

Many thanks
 

Ernesto

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how does it permeate through the surface on the laminate

It's can't really, unless the edges have a deep V groove. Is it chinese made laminate?

I've worked with chemically sensitive people many times and they smell things I cannot. I'd get rid of it and buy a natural fiber floor. Vinyl shouldn't be any better.
 

Incognito

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Different people hear, think, smell, feel, behave............WAY different than the most of us.

For this they get a lot of abuse when they try to explain and understand what's what.

Gotta admit. I'm way beyond confused with all the duct tape, used laminate......................?????????

Here's my take. The guy who's from another UNIVERSE can't cheap out and buy laminate flooring. Hell, I wouldn't take a dump on laminate flooring. If you have SPECIAL sensitivities you need to buy a floor that's going to be compatible with YOUR peculiar senses. They're out there. They're WAY more expensive than any cheap Chinese made plastic crap laminated to cardboard.

These Godforsaken GARBAGE PLASTIC BULLSHIT floors are without a doubt the worst possible selection. WTF were you thinking Bro?
 
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Chlorinated

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It's can't really, unless the edges have a deep V groove. Is it chinese made laminate?

I've worked with chemically sensitive people many times and they smell things I cannot. I'd get rid of it and buy a natural fiber floor. Vinyl shouldn't be any better.

I don't know country of origin as I but it was several years old and quickstep brand. it does have bevelled edges however like I said I covered it with duct tape so it cant emit from there.

only when I cover the surfaces does the smell go. any ideas?

I was thinking of trying another used laminate. natural fibre floor can still hold dust, mold, odours etc right? in which case it wouldn't be appropriate for me.

thanks.
 

Chlorinated

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btw why did u ask if it was Chinese?

could it be the fibreboard gassing? of course if everythings been sealed it doesn't make sense for the fibreboard to come up.
 

Incognito

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The Chinese are known for using a lot of chemicals that no one else will use.

One of the reasons Chinese products are so cost competitive in the U.S and European markets is a lack of comparable restrictions on their manufacturing costs-----labor laws, insurance, taxes, OSHA, EPA........

our manufacturers are SEVERELY handicapped to the point both YOU and I discount their prices as ABSURD.......an insult to be clear. Bottom line we can't afford all the BS restrictions we place on U.S. manufacturing. So we all buy cheap Chinese, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Bolivian.......WHATEVER goods and services made with virtually no integrity.

Good luck with that.
 

highup

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I'd be more concerned about the Duct tape adhesive that anything emanating from the laminate.
 

zannej

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Maybe next time use painter's tape? LOL.

It sounds like you might need actual linoleum which is made from organic components. (Not to be confused with sheet vinyl, which is often referred to as linoleum).

And, as the others have said, in China they are known to use chemicals that are banned in the US. There have been quite a few problems with milk substitutes and pet foods that had toxins in them that the Chinese used to trick the tests in to showing that they had more protein. Its hard to find stuff actually made in the US-- and even some stuff that they claim is made in the US was actually made on the island of Saipan (which is a US commonwealth). A lot of textiles are made in Saipan by Chinese laborers in conditions not permitted in the continental US.

I'm sorry to hear that you have such a sensitivity to the chemical smells. That must really suck. :-(
 

highup

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Well yeah the duct tape caused me problem as well but I only used it to check that the smell was coming from the surface.

Do you recall what kind of pad or cushion was used as an underlayment? I see so many different flooring products and am so used to them, that I don't really notice the smells like a homeowner would. I just can't imagine how an old floor would have any VOCs left in it.
 

Chlorinated

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Do you recall what kind of pad or cushion was used as an underlayment? I see so many different flooring products and am so used to them, that I don't really notice the smells like a homeowner would. I just can't imagine how an old floor would have any VOCs left in it.

It was fibreboard underlay. there wasn't any vocs from the surface when I bought it(surface) as I smelt it however the back did have a smell. of course when they cut it must have created some new gass however I just don't get how it comes up through the surface having ductaped all edges. weird. unless that particular laminate has a porous surface which is unlikely.
 
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