After the fact seam sealing

Discussion in 'Carpeting' started by highup, Jan 27, 2019.

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  1. Jan 27, 2019 #1

    highup

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    .not really seam sealing. Edge sealing. An installer didn't seal the edge of a direct glue down installation that butts to tile. I'm going there tomorrow to trim the loose and frayed carpet edges that were the main complaint. Is there any type of clear sealer that can be carefully "dribbled" along that edge? Something that won't attract dirt over time? I'm thinking that I could lean a 6 inch drywall spreader over the carpet and let the sealer flow next to the metal and absorb into the carpet backing to stop future raveling.
    It's a looped pile carpet, nothing special. The edge is all a butt edge, not along the rows. 24 feet I suppose
    The tile has a metal edge. I can't believe it wasn't sealed.
     

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  2. Jan 27, 2019 #2

    DarisMulkin

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  3. Jan 27, 2019 #3

    highup

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    Acrylic? Goes on white or clear? I read a couple days ago about a Roberts/Capitol AC44 Dat it? I'm doubting anyone here has it. Screw the needle into the plastic tip?
     
  4. Jan 28, 2019 #4

    DarisMulkin

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    Or you can shove it up inside the nozzle. The Orcon sealer could work also. That has a shine to it when dry so you would have to be careful how much you put on. Home cheapo has the Roberts if one in your area. There was a couple of spot that the yarn was letting loose and I pushed the yarn into it. I have also used regular sealer but it is hard to push through, then you definitely want the needle on the inside. You do want to check the needle on ocassion to make sure it is still tight. Oh, if you can I'd run a row runner in the seam first.
     
  5. Jan 28, 2019 #5

    highup

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    Not a seam Daris. Thin commercial carpet butting to tile.
    Orcon doesn't dry clear.
     
  6. Jan 28, 2019 #6

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  7. Jan 28, 2019 #7

    DarisMulkin

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    Glue down? Then I'd use seam sealer.
     
  8. Jan 28, 2019 #8

    highup

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    Needs to be clear. Not sure If there's ever been such an animal in our state. Also it can't attract dirt or discolor. Might be better to snip frayed ends for now and wait till it gets bad........... then cut back 3 inches and add a decorative border color............ but sealed this time.
     
  9. Jan 28, 2019 #9

    Floorist

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    Some hot melt glue sticks dry clear. They should hold.
     
  10. Jan 28, 2019 #10

    highup

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    That's on my list. I made a tip from some 3/16 copper tubing for some stairs a few years ago. I rolled in the top so the tip's exit hole is really small. Sometimes the heat from the tip is enough.
     
  11. Jan 29, 2019 #11

    highup

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    Did a lot of snipping with my napping shears............. 25 feet or more? I snipped a lot of the loops off at the edge at a high angle along with trimming the loose/frayed loops. I figure if there's no loop on the actual edge, then there is no loop to snag. Can't see the difference visually, so a loop and a cut look the same along the tile edge. I used a product called Fray Check" to flood the edges where I thought it might help control further issues.
    He may have used sealer. If he did, maybe it could have been done better. Better= time. Time=money ...ah, screw it we got to get the job done.
     
  12. Jan 29, 2019 #12

    Ernesto

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    Might have wanted to check if you could have pulled loose the area and (adding glue) plus power stretch a little to get a good crimp on the metal. Would include opening up the metal- clamp down or flat, (you didn't say or i missed it) then re fix metal.
    Sorry, late to this game.
    P.S. glue sticks set hard and show too much
     
  13. Jan 29, 2019 #13

    highup

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    Not that kind of metal Ern. Tile metal, not carpet metal. Butting to a 90 degree metal edge. It's a direct glue down looped pile commercial. Carpet and tile about the same height.
    Tile has a metal edge and the carpet butts to that. I snipped the stray loops flush and sealed the ones that looked like they needed some additional help. It might have been sealed originally, bit not the way I would have done it.
    I would have cut the edge flush to the metal, carefully sealed the edge with latex sealer, then folded the carpet back to glue it, then sealed the tile edge with solvent based carpet seam sealer before dropping it into the carpet adhesive. Who can afford to replace a large carpet installation because of an edge sealing failure?
    I mean, so it took another hour messing with the sealer...... so freekin what?
    I got 1 1/2 hours in to this and a stair issue and charged $105 - $4 for the sealer and $3 in fuel.
    $98 day better than nothin'
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2019

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