Jamb Saw

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Laney

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Hey, dudes.
Long time no ask. It's me, Chuck Coffer from all those years ago. Anyway, I can't decide between the Crain 812 and the 835. I've worn my 812 out after what feels like 20 years. I'm thinking of getting the 835 (the grinder form factor). Seems like it would be more stable and accurate. Whatsay you?

Thanks in advance,
Chuck.
 

C.J.

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I’ve got the 812 but 99% of the time I use my dewalt multi tool for undercutting door jambs. My buddy has the 835 and I gotta admit I kinda like it. After he plunges the cut he gives the handle a little tip which gives the blade a dip and that just makes sure everything is cleared out in the cut as opposed to just where the blade plunged. Kinda neat little trick I learned from him. Now for undercutting fireplaces n such I prefer my 812. Just seems like it was meant to slide along the floor better than the 835 but the 835 seems a better fit for jambs and corners where you have 2 jambs next to each other. I don’t really like the 812 for corners cus I need to finish off the inside of the corner with my multi tool anyway. 835 has a lower profile and that can, and has, made a difference depending on what you’re cutting (rock fireplace??) They both have a dust port which is a huge bonus.

What will you be using it for the majority of the time, jambs or fireplaces? That would be my determining factor. I suppose commercial vs residential makes a big difference as well. If you have 150 jambs (per floor) to undercut, I’m not using my multi tool.
 
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Floorist

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Back in the old days at the Armstrong vinyl school, we were never taught to undercut door jambs. All vinyl was to be cut, as Jon would say, "neat". I installed many a vinyl job where no trim was necessary. I know with current products you must undercut.
 

Laney

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I’ve got the 812 but 99% of the time I use my dewalt multi tool for undercutting door jambs. My buddy has the 835 and I gotta admit I kinda like it. After he plunges the cut he gives the handle a little tip which gives the blade a dip and that just makes sure everything is cleared out in the cut as opposed to just where the blade plunged. Kinda neat little trick I learned from him. Now for undercutting fireplaces n such I prefer my 812. Just seems like it was meant to slide along the floor better than the 835 but the 835 seems a better fit for jambs and corners where you have 2 jambs next to each other. I don’t really like the 812 for corners cus I need to finish off the inside of the corner with my multi tool anyway. 835 has a lower profile and that can, and has, made a difference depending on what you’re cutting (rock fireplace??) They both have a dust port which is a huge bonus.

What will you be using it for the majority of the time, jambs or fireplaces? That would be my determining factor. I suppose commercial vs residential makes a big difference as well. If you have 150 jambs (per floor) to undercut, I’m not using my multi tool.
I have an old 800 that I can't get the blade off of. Back before the Fein tool, you'd kill to get a centimeter deeper with a jamb saw. I bought the 812 before they hit the market because of how easy it made cutting a fireplace. Perhaps it s a grass being greener deal, but I always liked the ergonomics of that grinder saw they came out with after I bought my 812. For me, the bitch is I have a place in my truck designed specifically for my 812 case. Space is always a factor for me. My bus is always overloaded.

Thanks for the insight.
 

Laney

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Back in the old days at the Armstrong vinyl school, we were never taught to undercut door jambs. All vinyl was to be cut, as Jon would say, "neat". I installed many a vinyl job where no trim was necessary. I know with current products you must undercut.
My dad taught Congoleum's schools. I learned on pretty tuff stuff, but congo never made anything like corlon or designer. I think esteem was the toughest product they made. But you could still double cut it. Hell, nowadays, medintech is like working with interflex. hehe
 

Laney

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I’ve got the 812 but 99% of the time I use my dewalt multi tool for undercutting door jambs. My buddy has the 835 and I gotta admit I kinda like it. After he plunges the cut he gives the handle a little tip which gives the blade a dip and that just makes sure everything is cleared out in the cut as opposed to just where the blade plunged. Kinda neat little trick I learned from him. Now for undercutting fireplaces n such I prefer my 812. Just seems like it was meant to slide along the floor better than the 835 but the 835 seems a better fit for jambs and corners where you have 2 jambs next to each other. I don’t really like the 812 for corners cus I need to finish off the inside of the corner with my multi tool anyway. 835 has a lower profile and that can, and has, made a difference depending on what you’re cutting (rock fireplace??) They both have a dust port which is a huge bonus.

What will you be using it for the majority of the time, jambs or fireplaces? That would be my determining factor. I suppose commercial vs residential makes a big difference as well. If you have 150 jambs (per floor) to undercut, I’m not using my multi tool.
p.s. I didn't answer your question in a proper way. I mainly use my 812 for fireplaces because of the dust port and diamond blade. Thing is, I'd rather have a saw I could use for everything. That might be a pipe dream.
 

C.J.

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Don’t know if there is a one size fits all for that. I used to use my 812 for everything until I discovered the multi tool. Every once in a blue moon the 812 would hit a nail and blow out part of a jamb. That could end up costing me money when that happens. That doesn’t happen with a multi tool. The multi tool is more precise but slower. Don’t need to really worry about dust with a multi tool like you do with the 812 or 835. It also gets into smaller, tighter spots that the 812 or 835 couldn’t even dream of. On the flip side I’m never going to undercut a fireplace with a multi tool. I think the longer you are in this trade, the more tools you have and there is definitely a reason for that.

I definitely undercut way more jambs than I do fireplaces so if I was to choose between the 812 or the 835 and I could only choose one I think I would go with the 835.
 

highup

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Hey, dudes.
Long time no ask. It's me, Chuck Coffer from all those years ago. Anyway, I can't decide between the Crain 812 and the 835. I've worn my 812 out after what feels like 20 years. I'm thinking of getting the 835 (the grinder form factor). Seems like it would be more stable and accurate. Whatsay you?

Thanks in advance,
Chuck.
Holy living pile of.......
Welcome to the forum Chu!
I use a hacksaw with a fine tooth blade. 😁
I'd actually give you some serious advice but my jobs are so small I use my Fine Multi Master when I need to undercut.
 

highup

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For undercutting brick and stone I welded feet to the guard on my angle grinder and used a diamond blade. The feet are adjustable. MK makes a blade that will cut flush to the surface if you were trying to install vinyl. It's raised up in the center so the nut won't contact the floor or whatever you're cutting. Depth of courses limited with a four and a half inch angle grinder.
Dust containment is an issue. 😁
That said, it works really well.
 

Laney

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For undercutting brick and stone I welded feet to the guard on my angle grinder and used a diamond blade. The feet are adjustable. MK makes a blade that will cut flush to the surface if you were trying to install vinyl. It's raised up in the center so the nut won't contact the floor or whatever you're cutting. Depth of courses limited with a four and a half inch angle grinder.
Dust containment is an issue. 😁
That said, it works really well.
Being the subject of a silica lawsuit is an issue. Been there, Done that.
 

highup

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Being the subject of a silica lawsuit is an issue. Been there, Done that.
When I made that tool modification 20 years ago I invented the SuckerDown 2000 as a dust control supplement to that tool. I think the tool itself was deemed the Cutterdown 2000.
It may look like a cardboard box to the unaided eye, but it was a highly modified cardboard box
.......with attachments.
OSHA would have drooled and with their eyes bugged out, looking like on a 1950s cartoon. I mean, we're talkin, AHOOOGA!!! eyes.
 
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Laney

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FWIW, I 'm loving that big Crain grinder saw. I wish I could remember the number. It's the one that costs around tree fitty. I hated the adjustment mechanism at first, but once I got used to it, I love it. The ergonomics are what makes it great. Its got big balls too. It doesn't have that big gaping mouth my 812 had, but that's what makes it more stable.

I endorse.
 

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