Pouring LevelQuik; Holes in Floor

Discussion in 'Beginners Forum' started by soparklion11, Jan 7, 2019.

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  1. Jan 7, 2019 #1

    soparklion11

    soparklion11

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    I need to pour ~20 bags of levelquik to level my basement floor before I put an actual floor on it. Do I need to pour it all at once? I've poured small pads of concrete, but this is my first time using LevelQuik. I do plan to use an acrylic bonding agent. Any other advice?

    Also, there are small holes in the floor. I'm unsure of their purpose. They are along both exterior and interior walls. Should I preserve them? I also have an interior french drain. The concrete slab (not free floating or I wouldn't need the drain) does still get damp when I leave plastic over it for a time...
     
  2. Jan 7, 2019 #2

    highup

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    All in one pour and you need to be fast. This isn't a one man job.
    How many rooms are you doing and is the floor level now?

    Those holes you mentioned. How large are they?
    Is this on grade or a basement?
    What sort of flooring do you plan to install?
    Describe the french drain.
    Pretend you are pouring thick water. If there are any openings along the walls, the stuff will seep under them.

    I think most self levelers require a primer. I wouldn't skip that step. Use the manufacturers brand made for the product.

    The dampness is a big concern. They make products that might stop that moisture, but they are vapor emissions retarder/primers. A regular primer won't stop the moisture.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 7, 2019
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  3. Jan 7, 2019 #3

    Nick

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  4. Jan 7, 2019 #4

    highup

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    I re read the part about those holes. 1" or so in diameter? a couple feet apart? Someone probably had a pest control company pump insecticide into the ground. They drill evenly spaced holes in the slab them fill them with a latex or cement filler after they are done. Not much way to preserve them.
     
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  5. Jan 8, 2019 #5

    soparklion11

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  6. Jan 9, 2019 #6

    highup

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    No, the barrier must be put on the cement first, then the leveling compound.
    It must be part of the leveling manufacturers system.

    Look online for a product called UZIN.
    http://www.uzin.us/products/product-search/details/uzin-nc-170-levelstar-leveling-compound-3214/
    It can fill more square feet per bag than Levelquick even tho both are 50 lb bags.
    22 1/2 sq feet for Levelquick poured 1/4" deep and UZIN does 30 sq feet per bag.
    They have an epoxy primer that will stop moisture and the rep said it would work on concrete that just 3 days old.
    It will not be inexpensive.
    Here's the UZIN contact number. http://www.uzin.us/meta-navigation/contact/
    I'd talk to them about the suitability of their products to your situation.
    Their epoxy primer requires that the surface of the concrete be ground with some sort of grinder to remove a small amount of the surface of the concrete in order for the product to bond and soak into the concrete.


    I initially missed all of your responses except the last one. I don't think even with what I described above, engineered wood flooring would be recommended.
    To me it seems with the known moisture issues and French drain it would be hard to chose a flooring unless some type of high quality sealer was applied to stop the moisture. I'm not talking any sealer, I'm talking about one made to go with the floor leveler of choice. The UZIN sealer/primer needs to be applied just like it says to, and follow the safety instructions to the letter. Unneeded mixed primer that is left in a container gets very hot and gives off fumes, so you need to set the unused mixed epoxy outside for safety.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
  7. Jan 9, 2019 #7

    highup

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    I'd also ask around where you live about those holes in the floor. Have they ever been filled or are they open holes?
     
  8. Jan 11, 2019 #8

    soparklion11

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    Thank you very much.

    Is there an alternative to a poured leveling product? Since I have >1" to fill, could I pour a bonding agent over the deeper areas and cover with a layer of cement, then pour a thinner layer of self-leveling compound? If so, what cement compound would be more appropriate; it would need to have a decent working time.
     
  9. Jan 11, 2019 #9

    Ernesto

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  10. Jan 11, 2019 #10

    soparklion11

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    That product looks great!

    If the 'deep' edge will be over 1" is it easier to just fill it in with concrete and then use a self-leveling compound on top? If so, what product would I place after the moisture membrane and before the levelquik?
     
  11. Jan 11, 2019 #11

    Ernesto

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    The MSP, you should be able to use gravel in your deep pour area with SLC. I would only use Mapei products exclusively.
     
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  12. Jan 21, 2019 at 4:42 AM #12

    Eugene Dunikov

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    We use Moisture Barrier from Surecrete. You will need to broadcast silica sand into it for better adhesion of leveler
     
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  13. Jan 21, 2019 at 12:48 PM #13

    soparklion11

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    Thank you to everyone for your input. UPDATE: I've ground the surface of the concrete and ordered Mapei Planiseal, which I plan to use as a vapor barrier, sanding the top to improve the bonding of the leveling agent. I will still use a bonding agent, correct?
     
  14. Jan 22, 2019 at 8:07 AM #14

    highup

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    Kudos for grinding the concrete. That makes the sealer bond the way that the manufacturer wants it to.
    I'd ask Mapai.
    Sand first, apply the MVP next then the self leveler.

    It said up to 15 lbs . Your's sounds like it needs more than that. You said it gets damp... (does still get damp when I leave plastic over it for a time...)
    If it's visually noticeable, I'd step back and do measuring to find out exactly what you are dealing with. Visually noticeable means very wet.
    UZIN 's MVP epoxy primer has NO moisture limitations ......as opposed to Mapai's 15 lbs max limit.
    Slow down and keep researching. You have issues and need to do this right, or as right as possible.
    Contact the tech line from more than one self leveling manufacturer and describe to them your exact situation. They will tell you what they can promise and what the can't.
    They can tell you what you can and can't do.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2019 at 8:12 AM
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