Carpet transition to vinyl planks

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paqman

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So I let the hot glue dry before tucking it in? What was the purpose of the seam sealer? Kind of sounded like it was two-fold, to keep the edge from fraying, and to glue it in place down on the floor? But you're just wanting the edge to dry stiff in it's tucked position?
 

MSLI

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I've never just tucked carpet into lvp but if the guys here say it's good to go, I'm on board
My criteria, that must be met for tucking to LVP would be that it must be at least 3/16 to 1/4” thick. How about you guys ? But I prefer a standard size of 3/8 “ to 7/16” That’s why end caps or thresholds usually work best and if you choose the right one, very stylish. Every situation is different, that’s why the world of floor installation needs ‘ Installation Managers ‘ I bet if we did an IRS search for that occupation, very little numbers would come up.
 

MSLI

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So I let the hot glue dry before tucking it in? What was the purpose of the seam sealer? Kind of sounded like it was two-fold, to keep the edge from fraying, and to glue it in place down on the floor? But you're just wanting the edge to dry stiff in it's tucked position?
Yes ! Let it dry, essentially we are turning an action back carpet into a ‘hot melt back’ carpet and that in itself will help eliminate fraying. I’m not a big fan of wet gluing the tuck and I’ll tell you why. Shit happens, and sometimes you’ll need to remove the tucked carpet and now an 1/8” of it is stuck and breaks away 😡 For me dry is better.
 

paqman

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Yes ! Let it dry, essentially we are turning an action back carpet into a ‘hot melt back’ carpet and that in itself will help eliminate fraying. I’m not a big fan of wet gluing the tuck and I’ll tell you why. Shit happens, and sometimes you’ll need to remove the tucked carpet and now an 1/8” of it is stuck and breaks away 😡 For me dry is better.
OK gotcha. So I'm removing the tape is to make it easier to tack strip and tuck, and the hot glue is to help eliminate fraying. And the tuck just sticks mostly because of the stiff back and friction then.
 

MSLI

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Also, believe it or not, some thermoplastic remains slightly sticky after dry, ( cool glide sticks) and if you cut and tuck it tight into the gully properly, you don’t need adhesive down there as a back up. Good luck pagan and have fun with it.
 

DarisMulkin

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I forgot a little trick I learned from an installer/cleaner. Use a regular household iron and a wet towel over the sean tape and you can virtually lift the tape and also the glue comes up with it. I had to go 3 hrs from home and do a seam repair this fellow had done in a a berber. Also he had an artificial leg that was laying in the middle of the floor. But after the shock woore off he was removing the tape from the carpet which in the instructions from the mill was we had to handsew the seam and I was really worried on how I was going to push a needle threw that thermo. Well with th iron and wet towel it all came out and pushing a needle in carpet was no problem. Even taught the installer how to sew so we both learned something.
 

paqman

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I forgot a little trick I learned from an installer/cleaner. Use a regular household iron and a wet towel over the sean tape and you can virtually lift the tape and also the glue comes up with it. I had to go 3 hrs from home and do a seam repair this fellow had done in a a berber. Also he had an artificial leg that was laying in the middle of the floor. But after the shock woore off he was removing the tape from the carpet which in the instructions from the mill was we had to handsew the seam and I was really worried on how I was going to push a needle threw that thermo. Well with th iron and wet towel it all came out and pushing a needle in carpet was no problem. Even taught the installer how to sew so we both learned something.
Thanks, I'll give that a shot!
 

highup

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I forgot a little trick I learned from an installer/cleaner. Use a regular household iron and a wet towel over the sean tape and you can virtually lift the tape and also the glue comes up with it. I had to go 3 hrs from home and do a seam repair this fellow had done in a a berber. Also he had an artificial leg that was laying in the middle of the floor. But after the shock woore off he was removing the tape from the carpet which in the instructions from the mill was we had to handsew the seam and I was really worried on how I was going to push a needle threw that thermo. Well with th iron and wet towel it all came out and pushing a needle in carpet was no problem. Even taught the installer how to sew so we both learned something.
How about using the iron to get the tape off and then put a dry towel on top of the adhesive residue that's left in the carpet backing, and apply the iron to the towel, the dry towel. Might it act as a wick to pull more adhesive residue out of the carpet backing just making it more pliable?
You probably want to use one of those cheap, white terry cloth towels that you find in the automotive department of stores.
I think I'm going to try that just to see what happens next time I pull up some carpet.
 

highup

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yeah, I hadn't heard the term baby threshold, but yes, end cap is what I plan on using to do this tuck method. The plank by itself I think is not deep enough to really do this. I think the end cap will look better.
This is what they call baby threshold.
We may be thinking about the same thing.
I looked online and cannot find what used to be referred to as an end cap. It was a 3/4-in wide trim that was intended to butt up to things like a sliding glass door or a front door threshold.
One side overlapped the laminate or lvp and the other side was unfinished with a square edge, and that button directly to the door frame.
 

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paqman

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The good thing about this version is it snaps securely into a track but still allows for expansion and contraction of the vinyl or laminate under the flange. A much better option than tucking directly to the floating floor.
Yeah I think it should work well. I'm going to give this a shot today. Melt off the tape, add some hot glue to the end to prevent fraying, kick over the tack strip, then tuck to the end cap.
 

Incognito

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I think I will try to remove the seap tape, then will bring the LVP up with an end cap/trim peice, and try to tuck the carpet to it as you guys have said. Wish me luck.
Home Depot or most any rental yard will rent out carpet irons. I'd recommend using the right tool. It's not difficult to do. Use the lower heat setting and allow the glue to soften up slowly. We would use an awl but any sharp object, even a pair of needlenose pliers to GRADUALLY peel the tape off from one side as you slowly and gently slide the iron across the tape-------do I have to say you're doing all this from the backside of the carpet, folded back? When I've done this, usually seam repairs, I'd usually have a putty knife and scrap off wads of glue------ besides peeling the tape scrape most of the glue from the back of the goods. It's that hard thermoplastic glue that's gonna fight you from making a nice, neat tuck into the LVT as shown in the video above.
 

paqman

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Home Depot or most any rental yard will rent out carpet irons. I'd recommend using the right tool. It's not difficult to do. Use the lower heat setting and allow the glue to soften up slowly. We would use an awl but any sharp object, even a pair of needlenose pliers to GRADUALLY peel the tape off from one side as you slowly and gently slide the iron across the tape-------do I have to say you're doing all this from the backside of the carpet, folded back? When I've done this, usually seam repairs, I'd usually have a putty knife and scrap off wads of glue------ besides peeling the tape scrape most of the glue from the back of the goods. It's that hard thermoplastic glue that's gonna fight you from making a nice, neat tuck into the LVT as shown in the video above.
Thanks for the tips. Ha yeah I get that I'm doing this from the back, but it's good of you not to assume I knew.
 

paqman

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So I'm still doing some planning. (well still working on vinyl planks and haven't gotten to these doors yet. But now looking at the door to my master bedroom. The seam is way back further than the other two rooms. It's a double door entrance. The seam is almost in line with the inside corner of the jamb. So I suppose I just won't be able to get ideal placement here right? I just have to go slightly behind the seam? So I will just have some vinyl floor/transition showing from the bedroom side. I folded it under so the break in the carpet is obvious:
20220311_132446.jpg
 

JPfloor

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Yes...

Looks like you'll make it with a stretch.... Power stretcher will do the job. A mini stretcher (crab) might work. A good trick is to use a 2X4 across the door jamb. Don't pull too hard or you'll rip the door frame out!
 

paqman

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Yes...

Looks like you'll make it with a stretch.... Power stretcher will do the job. A mini stretcher (crab) might work. A good trick is to use a 2X4 across the door jamb. Don't pull too hard or you'll rip the door frame out!
Ha well I don't have any sort of stretcher, just a knee kicker.
Looks like you need 4” of plank then install the 2.25” end cap appx 1/8” from end of door jam. Maybe burn off the seam first to see how much play you have.
Well once the seam is burned off the edge of the carpet is going to be close to the inside edge of the door jamb. I can tell because of where it's bending now.

Sorry, I haven't done any of this yet, because I'm considering just paying a neighbor who is a carpet installer to just come and do it. I've done this whole project diy (painted cabinets, installed backsplash, flooring, etc.) but these carpet transitions are beyond what I've done or have tools for I think.
 

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