carpet on concrete floor

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I once asked how far from a wall should the "tackstrip" be? I was told it should go at least 5/8".Well,I've nailed it down a couple inches from the wall to allow myself plenty of room for the "tackstrip" to grab the carpet and hold it when I use the "carpet stretcher". Now, I have a question about that couple inch wide area of bare concrete that will contact the carpet. Should I worry about moisture from the concrete "leaching" into the carpet and discoloring it? BTW, this house is over 35 yrs. old,the concrete is well cured and the floor looks to be very dry.

tnx,
 
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so I should pull up the tackstrips? don't forget,this is my own house so I'm not worried about a customer whining about the strips being too far from the wall. what I really want to know is whether carpet can safely contact concrete? it just seems like even if you left just enough room to tuck in the carpet, that carpet would still be in contact with the concrete.

tnx,
 

highup

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so I should pull up the tackstrips? don't forget,this is my own house so I'm not worried about a customer whining about the strips being too far from the wall. what I really want to know is whether carpet can safely contact concrete? it just seems like even if you left just enough room to tuck in the carpet, that carpet would still be in contact with the concrete.

tnx,

Depending on th4e pad thickness and carpet style/thickness, you might have room to add a second layer of tackstrip in front of the one you already have down now to get the correct gap
Here's your purple carpet and the 3/8" gap that will be more appropriate. No carpet I have ever seen needs a gap 1/2" wide. That would work, but a 3/8" gap would probably be about right for most carpets.
When you cut the carpet at the wall, it should be about 1/8" to 1/4" too long. That excess material is then tucked, or pounded downwards into that small 3/8" gully between the tackstrip and the wall to create a clean edge. A 2 inch gap allows no gully to tuck the carpet edge into.

Tackstrip gap with arrow.jpg
 
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Depending on th4e pad thickness and carpet style/thickness, you might have room to add a second layer of tackstrip in front of the one you already have down now to get the correct gap
Here's your purple carpet and the 3/8" gap that will be more appropriate. No carpet I have ever seen needs a gap 1/2" wide. That would work, but a 3/8" gap would probably be about right for most carpets.
When you cut the carpet at the wall, it should be about 1/8" to 1/4" too long. That excess material is then tucked, or pounded downwards into that small 3/8" gully between the tackstrip and the wall to create a clean edge. A 2 inch gap allows no gully to tuck the carpet edge into.

I understand about getting the edge of the carpet down into the "gulley",makes sense. Isn't the job of the "baseboard" to keep it down there?

tnx,
 

highup

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I understand about getting the edge of the carpet down into the "gulley",makes sense. Isn't the job of the "baseboard" to keep it down there?

tnx,

I'll add a bit more in case you're still watching.
Baseboards are typically installed first, and like Nick said, tucked between the tack strip and the baseboard.
Often times, I see baseboard installed slightly off the floor and the carpet edge will tuck under/into that gap. So if that's what you are referring to, I suppose yes, it does sort of 'hold down' the carpet edge.
Baseboards are not installed with the purpose of holding down the carpet edge....... the tackstrip gully or gap is created for that purpose. The tackstrip holds the carpet down, and tucking the carpet down into the gap creates the clean looking edge.

Oh, about the moisture. Small amounts of moisture can pass through the carpet and evaporate, but moisture doesn't pass through the pad as easily as it does the carpet.
If there is a lot of moisture, time will tell if it's enough to cause a problem. If you suspect or already know there is a lot of moisture in the slab, then that should be dealt with before installing the carpet
 
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DarisMulkin

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I'll add a bit more in case you're still watching.
Baseboards are typically installed first, and like Nick said, tucked between the tack strip and the baseboard.
Often times, I see baseboard installed slightly off the floor and the carpet edge will tuck under/into that gap. So if that's what you are referring to, I suppose yes, it does sort of 'hold down' the carpet edge.
Baseboards are not installed with the purpose of holding down the carpet edge....... the tackstrip gully or gap is created for that purpose. The tackstrip holds the carpet down, and tucking the carpet down into the gap creates the clean looking edge.

That also is the locking mechanism.

Daris
 

CarolPalmer

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Before installing the tack strips along the perimeter of the wall 1/4 to 1/2 inch from the wall ensure how much carpet is needed. Ensure that the angled pins on th etack strip bend towards the wall. Once the carpet is fitted over the bent pins, the carpet would remain from slipping
 

DarisMulkin

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Before installing the tack strips along the perimeter of the wall 1/4 to 1/2 inch from the wall ensure how much carpet is needed. Ensure that the angled pins on th etack strip bend towards the wall. Once the carpet is fitted over the bent pins, the carpet would remain from slipping

Tackstrip is never to be more that 3/8" from the wall according to CRI [Carpet and Rug Institue] standards. Most installers judge it by the tip of their fore finger.

Daris
 
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